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What are the best lines you have ever read?

  

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The last lines from a Mark Twain story always stick in my mind. It's from 'The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm', where Mr. McWilliams tells of the trials and tribulations of owning a burglar alarm.

"I just said to Mrs. McWilliams that I had had enough of that kind of pie; so with her full consent I took the whole thing out and traded it off for a dog, and shot the dog. I don't know what you think about it, Mr. Twain; but I think those things are made solely in the interest of the burglars. Yes, sir, a burglar alarm combines in its person all that is objectionable about a fire, a riot, and a harem, and at the same time had none of the compensating advantages, of one sort or another, that customarily belong with that combination. Good-by: I get off here."

"Winston, if you were my husband, I would poison your coffee!" Lady Astor to Winston Churchill at a dinner party.

"Madam, if I were your husband, I would drink it!" Winston Churchill's response to Lady Astor.

From J.P. Hartley's book "The Go-Between"

"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."

"But you know what? Some people don't want to be saved. Because saving means changing. And changeing is always harder than staying the same. It takes courage to face yourself in the mirror and look beyond the reflection. To find the you that you should have been. The you who got derailed by cruel childhood events Event's that took your life's natural trajectory and twisted it. Changeing it into something unimagenable... or even incredible... ... giving you the courage to embrace your birthright, your destiny, and finally realize...
                                                          ..... you ARE BATMAN."  ~ Tony S. Daniel, Battle for the Cowl.

 

Alittle cheesy, not the most sophisticated of sources, but I though it was pretty epic.

 

"God made us all different.Only dead bodies are identical. Respect the differences..."

So true :)

 

 

The last lines of the Great Gatsby, I guess. 

 

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And then one fine morning—
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

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