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Lesson 6 - Time in Russian

 

Time in Russian


There are many different ways to talk about time in Russian. Let’s study the simplest and most universal ones for now.

 

·      Утро (utro) – morning (5 am to noon is considered morning)

·      День (dyen') – day (noon to 5 pm, but you would not be mistaken, using the word den’ (day) while talking about usual business hours)

·      Вечер (vyechyer) – evening (usually time from 5 pm to 12 am is considered evening)

·      Ночь (noch') – night (12 am to about 5 am is considered night)

·      Полдень (poldyen') - noon

·      Полночь (polnoch') – midnight

 

What time is it please?:

Скажите пожалуйста, который час? - Skazhite pozhalusta kotoryj chas?

 

Like most of Europe, Russia uses the 24-hour system for all kinds of official messages: train schedules, TV programs, working hours, and so on. So, instead of 3 p.m., you can sometime hear pyatnadtsdat’ chasov (15 o'clock).

 

In casual conversation, most people just use the 12-hour clock. To indicate a.m. say nochi or utra (literally: in the morning) and p.m. would be dnya (literally: in the day), vechera (in the evening) or nochi (at night).

 

Use the following terms to express the time between the hours:

Минута (minuta), Минут (minut), Час (chas) - (hour), Часов (chasov) - (hours).

 

Russians say "o'clock" when expressing time, just as in the United States.

The word “Час” or “Часов” can be ommited.

 

Follow these simple rules:

When the total number of hours or minutes ends with the following digits use these rules:

·      1 – час, минута

·      2, 3, 4 – часа, минуты

·      5-20, 30, 40, 50 – часов, минут

 

Practice:

1:32

4:41

5:23

2:12

3:24

12:55

2:00

8:30

6:40

10:22

12:43

 

Now try to say this:

6:30 am

2:15 am

3:45 pm

8:20 pm

4:00 am

11:36 am

11:19 pm

1:40 am

7:13 am

 

Interpret this:

18:00

21:30

13:05

1:11

5:00

20:15

10:00

00:00

19:45

12:30

17:25

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