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Phrasal Verbs beginning with the letter "B"

 

BACK AWAY
(intransitive)to retreat backwards

The crowd backed away as the terrorist blew himself up.

BACK DOWN
(intransitive)to concede in a disagreement

The mugger backed down when he saw that Max was carrying a 9mm handgun.

BACK UP
(separable)to make copies of computer files just in case something happens to the original files

Please be sure to back up your files before you go home each day.

BACK UP
(separable)to help or support

I will back my friends up no matter what they do.

BACK UP
(separable)to go in reverse

When Steve passed the beautiful girl hitchhiking on the freeway, he immediately stopped the car, backed up, and offered her a ride.

BAIL OUT
(intransitive)to jump out of an airplane (usually when it?s going to crash)

Luckily the pilot bailed out before his plane hit the side of the mountain.

BAIL OUT
(intransitive)to quit or stop doing something (usually when experiencing difficulties)

The congressional candidate bailed out of the race because there was no hope that he could raise enough money to win.

BAIL OUT
(separable)to rescue someone from a difficult situation

Max?s uncle bailed him out of the financial problems he was having.

BALL UP
(separable)to roll or form something into a round shape

When max does his laundry, instead of folding everything nicely when it?s done, he just balls everything up and throws it in a bag.

BASH IN
(separable)to damage something by hitting it violently

Vandals bashed in the windows of my new Lamborghini.

BEAT UP
(separable)to hurt someone by hitting and/or kicking them repeatedly

The bully beat the other kids up for their lunch money.

BLACK OUT
(intransitive)to lose consciousness momentarily

Max had a very severe headache and blacked out several times, so his doctor admitted him to the hospital.

BLEND IN
(intransitive)to match or look the same as the surroundings

In Max's neighborhood, if you don't blend in, you'll get beat up.

BLOW OFF
(separable)to remove with powerful force

The bomb blew the roof off the house.

BLOW UP
(intransitive)to suddenly become angry

The teacher blew up when she discovered that the students hadn't done their homework.

BLOW UP
(separable)to explode or to destroy something with an explosion

Mary was arrested for blowing up Max's car with a homemade bomb.

BLOW UP
(separable)to inflate

Al's job was to sell the balloons. Jim's job was to blow them up.

BONE UP ON
(inseparable)to review, study, or practice a subject for a short period of time

I need to bone up on my math as I have a university entrance exam at the end of the month.

BOSS AROUND
(separable)to tell someone what to do repeatedly

Mary likes to boss people around.

BREAK DOWN
(intransitive)to stop functioning

John had to learn to become a good mechanic as his car was always breaking down.

BREAK DOWN
(intransitive)to lose control of one's emotions

Max broke down in tears when he heard that Mary had been arrested.

BREAK IN
(separable)to work or repeatedly use something so that it becomes comfortable or easily usable

Max's shoes hurt him as he had not yet broke them in.

BREAK IN
(intransitive)to forcibly enter a building

Max called the police when he thought he heard someone breaking in.

BREAK INTO
(inseparable)to forcibly enter

Mary broke into the car to steal the stereo.

BREAK OUT
(intransitive)to suddenly develop or erupt

A riot broke out in Los Angeles today.

BREAK UP
(separable)to cause to disperse or scatter

What time did the cops break the party up last night?

BREAK UP (WITH)
(separable)to end a relationship

Have Tom and Mary broken up yet? I'm thinking about asking Mary out on a date. The Beatles broke up a long time ago. Some people say that Yoko broke the band up. I'm going to break up with Mary. she bores me.

BRING ABOUT
(inseparable)to make happen

Max?s new girlfriend brought about some positive changes in his behavior.

BRING AROUND
(separable)to guide someone or convey something

I will bring the new intern around the office when she gets here.

BRING AROUND
(separable)to persuade, to cause to some on to do something through persuasion

Mary?s passionate speech brought Max around to donating to her organization.

BRING DOWN
(separable)to cause to fall

Michael Moore is hoping to bring the Bush administration down.

BRING FORTH
(separable)to produce or give rise to

The eager new intern brought forth many new ideas on how to run the company.

BRING IN
(separable)to arrest someone; to bring someone to the police station (usually for questioning)

The police brought Max in for robbing the bank.

BRING IN
(separable)to reach a verdict

The judge declared a mistrial because the jury could not bring in a verdict.

BRING IN
(separable)to earn money

Jill hates her new job, but she?s bringing in a lot of money.

BRING ON
(separable)to cause to appear

Bring on the birthday cake!

BRING UP
(separable)to raise or rear

Mowgli was a boy brought up by wolves.

BRING UP
(separable)to mention

When talking to Mary, Max never brings up her criminal record.

BRUSH UP ON
(intransitive)to practice; to improve your skill or knowledge

Max went back to school to brush up on mathematics.

BURN DOWN
(separable)to destroy by fire

Please don't smoke in bed for you may burn the house down.

BUTT IN
(intransitive)to enter a conversation uninvited

"Excuse me for butting in, but I couldn't help overhearing...

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