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Different accents in Italy?

I was curious if there are different Italian accents spoken by native speakers in Italy or if it's pretty much the same in all areas of the country. I often listen to Italian news on the internet and I don't really notice any different accents. Thank you friends.

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In Italy there are many different dialect and each Region or country have a different accent, It is clear that the speakers in internet or in Italian Tv haven't dialectal inflexion, but if you speak to an italian speaker born and living in Napoli  and then you speak to an italian speaker born in Milan o in Turin or generally in the North of Italy, surely you'll think that isn't the same language

 

Italy is comparable with England in terms of accents. On the television they use a standard accent (even though it isn't as standardised as the RP English one) but it changes from city to city (even though, overall, you can track a general inflection from state to state).

Just to give you a general idea (this comedian is from Rome, but some of the accents he impersonates are quite spot on. Don't worry if you don't understand a thing, he mixes dialects with the language):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNFNaSZ3GOU

 

Since I'm from Sardinia I can tell you that over here (Sardinia has less than 2 million people) there are at least 3-4 radically different accents.

I am wondering if there are native Italian speakers who have difficulity pronouncing the trill "r" sound...

 

No elanvital there isn't any native italian speaker who have difficulty pronouncing the trill "r". On the contrary we have difficulties not to pronounce it for example when we speak English!

Thank you Sara for answering my question!

 

I'm not Italian but I do am italian mother tongue since I grew up in the italian part of Switzerland,

and I can say that some people do have problems about the r prononciation.

But that's is nothing to do with the trill sound.

Some people just pronounce the "r" as the french r.

It means, they pronoune with the throat and not the tongue.

@Zechmann that's interesting! the french "r" sounds more difficult to me.

 

It is called "erre moscia", or, if the "impedement" is quite strong, the person could be called "bleso/a". It is a bit different from the French one as the sound is less strong.

I'm not studying Italian, but still found the discussion quite interesting.  Thank you all.

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