Site Feedback

English idioms

Here are a couple more English idioms.  He "gets my goat."  This means he is very annoying.

Another one is: I sometimes go "whole hog."   This means I sometimes go to extremes, or to use another idiom that means about the same: sometimes I "get carried away."  Another idiom along the same line is:  he "went bananas."  This means he became very emotional, even hysterical, and lost his self control.

 

Share:

Comments

It sounds so local that I did not hear. thanks for your sharing.

I think that "went bananas" is very funny. We all lose control sometimes, this can turn a situation into a lighter one after someone lost control :)))

 

It's so easy for a native speaker to forget about the confusion that can be caused when using these, so thanks for sharing! I'm sure it will help a lot of english students =)

I've also never heard of "gets my goat", I guess that must be a purely american one? That or I just don't remember hearing it 

There are so many idioms in English that the languange is "riddled with" them.  That is another idiom meaning to be full of.  So it means English is full of idioms, or it has many idioms.

I'm from the USA, and the first two are new to me too!

 

The goat and hog idiom must be a rural/farmer thing; seeing as how I'm a city girl :]

 

The banana thing references that money's like to eat banana's and they can go crazy when they see food.

 

Idioms or parables can be deeply rooted in local life that people outside don't understand. That's why it's best to just say what you mean :]

Another American idiom is she "drives me up a tree."  This means that she causes me to go crazy or to get on my nerves.  Another way to say it is "I can't stand that person."  A milder version is "she bugs me."

Add a comment