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Deutsch is not Dutch!

As I registered to this site yesterday, I was surprised to see 'Nederlands' (the language I'm using for this site) being called 'Deutsch' at the top of the homepage (next to the italki logo). There's a big difference between the two languages, since Nederlands (Dutch) is spoken in the Netherlands (or Holland) and Deutsch (German) is spoken in Germany. Could this possibly be changed?

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Here in the US, (I guess specifically the northereastern and midwestern US), we or they call the conservative Mennonites (the Amish) the Pennsylvania Dutch (I think that's right). They're obviously not Dutch or from the Netherlands; they have origins in Germany. What makes even less sense is that they also live in Indiania, Ohio, etc. Maybe down in Virginia. I think they speak a version of "low German", which maybe resembles something that was spoken in Europe in 1700 or so.

Mabye there are still some of the Mennonites or Amish in Europe. The Amish are the ones with no TV, radio, appliances, power tools, cars, etc. They wear the black clothes with the straw hats and men have to beards. They are allowed to accept rides from people though. If you look at some of them they're wearing like, black Nike or New Balance sneakers. So I guess someone must give them a lift to the mall to buy shoes. 

 

Sorry but if the fact that one language is spoken in one country and the other language is spoken in another country is the big difference between two languages, then you don't understand anything about languages. This is probably the most useless explanation to tell people why two languages are different (and why something should be changed on a website)! What about English in Australia and English in the UK?? What about Luxembourg where they have 3 official languages (2 of them are also spoken in other countries)?? etc etc etc

 

If you google a bit, you'll find many reasons why Dutch and German is different (most of the differences are grammatical) - but surely not that Dutch is spoken in the Netherlands and German in Germany!

 

But still: "Dutch is part of the German branch of the Indo-European language family. It is, therefore, closely related to English, German and the Scandinavian languages." (http://esl.fis.edu/grammar/langdiff/dutch.hmt)

@ Sarah: Sorry to get you mad! Haha... but if you read better, you'll notice that I wasn't at all trying to explain the differences between those languages whatsoever. I was only trying to show a way to slightly improve this website. I couldn't find a place to directly get in touch with the ones maintaining italki, and so I decided to dedicate my first discussion to this common fallacy.

 

I kinda like your resolute struggle for knowledge though!

You would be surprised to notice how many think people in Holland speak German!

While I was living in Taiwan I have to explain to both Asians and Americans that the suggestion is pretty sensitive in Holland.

I told the Americans that is like saying that Canada is part of the USA! Then they got the message: "That bad, he?!"

To give them an idea I told them that a Dutch comedian once joked that "it is good that the Germans broke down the Berlin Wall but they should rebuild it on the Dutch German border!"

There was also a very kind German bloke who loves to go to Holland but he showed a painful face when I told him that according to many my native language is German in stead of Dutch! 

@Sarah - it should be "...the Germanic branch the Indo-European language."  @Markus - "Mostly we lose at football to them.", or "Mostly we lose football matches to them."

I don't understand how anyone could confuse the two countries. Dutch architecture is unlike anything else in Europe or the world. (excepting, like, St. Maarten) 

   OOPT 

@Sarah I don't think you understand.

The site saying I'm looking at this page in Deutsch even though the text is Dutch is like the English version of the site saying the language is French.

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