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Food Ethics

When thinking of my associations between ethics, eating, politics, I am always apt to balance the taste and nutrition of what I eat every day. Either grocery shopping or eating outside matters in my daily life.

Since I live myself, the responsibility of grocery shopping falls on my own shoulder. Every time I do grocery shopping, I always think of some questions such as “How is the taste of this product?”, “Does it cost me a lot?”, “Is it organic?”, “Is it local?”, and “Is it convenient to cook?” These ethical questions bother me every time when I am in a grocery store or a supermarket because I fail either this question or other. Later on, I just find that what I purchase, what I eat, and where I go for grocery shopping is limited; namely, food consuming to me is not democratic. As Johnston and Cairns point out, since 19th-century, the consumers in UK and US have been struggling with markets and states in order to make food more affordable and accessible (Johnston et al, 2011:222). From the movement of “the politics of necessitous consumption” to “mass-consumption”, from the claiming of basic daily food demand to requiring of food safety, and from environmental concerns to challenging the food and market systems, people have always inevitably been subjected to food (Johnston et al, 2011:222-225).

However, due to the retreat of Western governments from their interventions and regulations in food markets, “eating for change”, as Johnston and Cairns terms, largely falls on consumers’’ shoulders (Johnston et al, 2011:226-229). As I exemplified myself above, it is really hard to achieve those food ethics by myself. Although there are some local farmers’ markets here, I am hardly to access them since I cannot afford a car to drive myself to the markets. This reflects what Johnston and Cairns say in their writing, one’s social class matters in one’s food choice (Johnston et al, 2011:228). To solve these problems, Johnston and Cairns offer the connect of the “ethical food-scape”, which “involves social constructions surrounding “ethical eating” and “connected to the material realities of food production” (Johnston et al, 2011:226-230).

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    My advice to you is to write in Chinese first, then spend the time translating it and polishing it.  Then I can help you in further polishing. Is this for school?  It is very dry, dull, long winded and in many places I don't understand enough to correct to your intent.  If I do, might as well I write the essay for you. Write simply.  For example, in the first paragraph, it can be written simply and more effective like,


    When coming to food, I am more concern about their taste and their nutrition.  Usually it is a compromise.  Therefore whether I grocery shop or to eat out, matters greatly.


    I corrected this way from your intent.  It sounds more personal and direct than the long winded way you used.  This is why I ask you to write in Chinese first.  You have a better grasp of your native tongue.  If you express in a dull form, no one will want to read it if they don't want to.  Ideas are independent of language.


    Why don't you rewrite this again?  You will see a dramatic difference if you do.

     

    Food Ethics

    When thinking of my associations between ethics, eating, politics, I am always apt to balance the taste and nutrition of what I eat every day. Either grocery shopping or eating outside matters in my daily life.

    Since I live myself, the responsibility of grocery shopping falls on my own shoulder. Every time I do grocery shopping, I always think of some questions such as “How is the taste of this product?”, “Does it cost me a lot?”, “Is it organic?”, “Is it local?”, and “Is it convenient to cook?” These ethical questions bother me every time when I am in a grocery store or a supermarket because I fail either this question or other. Later on, I just find that what I purchase, what I eat, and where I go for grocery shopping is limited; namely, food consuming to me is not democratic. As Johnston and Cairns point out, since 19th-century, the consumers in UK and US have been struggling with markets and states in order to make food more affordable and accessible (Johnston et al, 2011:222). From the movement of “the politics of necessitous consumption” to “mass-consumption”, from the claiming of basic daily food demand to requiring of food safety, and from environmental concerns to challenging the food and market systems, people have always inevitably been subjected to food (Johnston et al, 2011:222-225).

    However, due to the retreat of Western governments from their interventions and regulations in food markets, “eating for change”, as Johnston and Cairns terms, largely falls on consumers’’ shoulders (Johnston et al, 2011:226-229). As I exemplified myself above, it is really hard to achieve those food ethics by myself. Although there are some local farmers’ markets here, I am hardly to access them since I cannot afford a car to drive myself to the markets. This reflects what Johnston and Cairns say in their writing, one’s social class matters in one’s food choice (Johnston et al, 2011:228). To solve these problems, Johnston and Cairns offer the connect of the “ethical food-scape”, which “involves social constructions surrounding “ethical eating” and “connected to the material realities of food production” (Johnston et al, 2011:226-230).

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