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Santa's Iranian Reletives!!!! Traditional Stories about Nowruz (Iranian New Year)

 

Iranians have several traditions and customs that date back to thousands of years ago. However, after the Islamic revolution of Iran, Iranian traditions are dying out one by one. What I'd like to do is to keep our traditions alive, and introduce them to other people around the world. That is the only thing I can do to revive our customs.

Nowruz (Iranian New Year) has three mythical characters in Iranian folklore. On the eve of spring equinox, when the Persian New Year is celebrated, Amoo Nowruz brings children gifts, much like his Western counterpart Santa Claus. Amoo Nowruz is an old man who has a long white beard telling stories for children, passing the old story of Nowruz to the young, and giving children gifts like Santa. He accompanies with Haji Firuz, a young man, who wears a red costume, and his face is painted black (black is an ancient Persian symbol of good luck). He sings and dances with tambourines and trumpets spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. The sound of his songs and the sight of his dance are often analogous to hearing Christmas music in a shopping mall, telling all that Nowruz is in the air. Along with Amoo Norooz and Haji Firooz, the Persian New Year mythical characters include Naneh Sarma, sometimes called Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost. In the legend of Nowruz, it is narrated that Nane Sarma (Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost) is an old woman who falls in love with Amoo Nowruz. There is a beautiful love story between Nane Sarma and Amoo Nowruz. Each year, she is awaiting Amoo Nowruz to come but she falls asleep and never can see him.

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    Santa's Iranian Reletives!!!! Traditional Stories about Nowruz (Iranian New Year)

    Iranians have several traditions and customs dating back thousands of years ago. that date back to thousands of years ago. However, after the Islamic revolution of Iran, Iranian traditions are have beendying out one by one. What I'd like to do is to keep our traditions alive, and introduce them to other people around the world. That is the only thing I can do to revive our customs.

    Nowruz (Iranian New Year) has three mythical characters in Iranian folklore. On the eve of the spring equinox, when the Persian New Year is celebrated, Amoo Nowruz brings children gifts, much like his Western counterpart Santa Claus. Amoo Nowruz is an old man who has a long white beard, telling stories for to children, passing the old story of Nowruz to the young, and giving children gifts like Santa. He accompanies with Haji Firuz, a young man, who wears a red costume, and his face is painted black (black is an ancient Persian symbol of good luck). He sings and dances with tambourines and trumpets, spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. The sound of his songs and the sight of his dance are often analogous to hearing Christmas music in a shopping mall, telling all that Nowruz is in the air. Along with Amoo Norooz and Haji Firooz, the Persian New Year mythical characters include Naneh Sarma, sometimes called Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost. In the legend of Nowruz, it is narrated that Nane Sarma (Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost) is an old woman who falls in love with Amoo Nowruz. There is a beautiful love story between Nane Sarma and Amoo Nowruz. Each year, she is awaiting Amoo Nowruz to come but she falls asleep and never can see him.

     

    Beautiful Story! :)

    Hey Sarah! I am glad that you are spreading your culture! ^_^

    Iranians have several traditions and customs that date back to thousands of years ago. However, after the Islamic revolution of Iran, Iranian traditions have been dying out one by one. What I'd like to do is to keep our traditions alive, and introduce them to other people around the world. That is the only thing I can do to revive our customs.

    Nowruz (Iranian New Year) has three mythical characters in Iranian folklore. On the eve of the spring equinox, when the Persian New Year is celebrated, Amoo Nowruz brings children gifts, much like his Western counterpart Santa Claus. Amoo Nowruz is an old man who has a long white beard who tells stories to children, passing the old story of Nowruz to the young and giving children gifts just like Santa (“just” clarifies that “Santa” isn’t a gift, but that Santa gives gifts). He accompanies with Haji Firuz, a young man who wears a red costume, and whose face is painted black (black is an ancient Persian symbol of good luck). He sings and dances with tambourines and trumpets, spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. The sound of his songs and the sight of his dance are often analogous to hearing Christmas music in a shopping mall, telling all that Nowruz is in the air. Along with Amoo Norooz and Haji Firooz, the Persian New Year mythical characters include Naneh Sarma, sometimes called Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost. In the legend of Nowruz, it is narrated that Nane Sarma (Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost) is an old woman who falls in love with Amoo Nowruz. There is a beautiful love story between Nane Sarma and Amoo Nowruz. Each year, she awaits Amoo Nowruz to come (to come is implied) but she falls asleep and never can see him.

    Good job! As usual there are only minor mistakes. I find it suprizing how similar Iranian folklore is to Santa Clause! Are Nowruz celebrations still going on? How long do they last?

     

    Hey Sarah! I am glad that you are spreading your culture! ^_^

    Iranians have several traditions and customs that date back to thousands of years ago. However, after the Islamic revolution of Iran, Iranian traditions have been dying out one by one. What I'd like to do is to keep our traditions alive, and introduce them to other people around the world. That is the only thing I can do to revive our customs.

    Nowruz (Iranian New Year) has three mythical characters in Iranian folklore. On the eve of the spring equinox, when the Persian New Year is celebrated, Amoo Nowruz brings children gifts, much like his Western counterpart Santa Claus. Amoo Nowruz is an old man who has a long white beard who tells stories to children, passing the old story of Nowruz to the young and giving children gifts just like Santa (“just” clarifies that “Santa” isn’t a gift, but that Santa gives gifts). He accompanies with Haji Firuz, a young man who wears a red costume, and whose face is painted black (black is an ancient Persian symbol of good luck). He sings and dances with tambourines and trumpets, spreading good cheer and heralds the coming of the New Year. The sound of his songs and the sight of his dance are often analogous to hearing Christmas music in a shopping mall, telling all that Nowruz is in the air. Along with Amoo Norooz and Haji Firooz, the Persian New Year mythical characters include Naneh Sarma, sometimes called Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost. In the legend of Nowruz, it is narrated that Nane Sarma (Lady of the Cold Spells, or Grandma Frost) is an old woman who falls in love with Amoo Nowruz. There is a beautiful love story between Nane Sarma and Amoo Nowruz. Each year, she awaits Amoo Nowruz to come (to come is implied) but she falls asleep and never can see him.

    Good job! As usual there are only minor mistakes. I find it suprizing how similar Iranian folklore is to Santa Clause! Are Nowruz celebrations still going on? How long do they last?

     

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