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Is there to-infinitive in German?

Ich gehe zu die Bäckerei heute.
Heute gehe ich zu die Bäckerei.

Ich habe zu die Bäckerei gestern gegangen.
Gestern habe ich zu die Bäckerei gegangen.
( The grammar book says it's more common to use perfect tense (habe gegangen) than simple past(ging) in German. Is it true?)

Is there to-infinitive in German? How can I say
I go to the bakery shop "to buy bread" in German?

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    Corrections

     

    Ich gehe heute zur Bäckerei heute.
    Heute gehe ich zur Bäckerei.

    Ich habe bin gestern zur Bäckerei gestern gegangen.
    Gestern habe bin ich zur Bäckerei gegangen.
    ( The grammar book says it's more common to use perfect tense (habe gegangen) than simple past(ging) in German. Is it true?) TRUE

    Is there to-infinitive in German? How can I say
    I go to the bakery shop "to buy bread" in German? SEE EXAMPLE OF COLDWORLD

     

    The perfect tense is either haben + participe perfect or sein + participe perfect. This depends on the verb. Usually all verbs concerning any kind of "movement" are composed with sein:

    ich bin gegangen, ich bin gefahren, ich bin gekommen, ich bin gelaufen etc.

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