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Bok! Introduction with more words that I picked up.

Another introduction, just using more words that i just picked up.
Bok! Zovem Thatcher, i želim govoriti hrvatski jezik. Sada govorim slabo, ali učim svaki dan. Stanujem u predgrađu u Minneapolisu, u Minnesotu, u Ameriku. Učim kineski u školi, ali ne govorim kineski također tako dobro. Hrvatski nije prost jezik, ali mislim da nije jako težak. Nemam učitelj za hrvatskom jeziku, ali učim mnogo. Možde putujem u Zagrebu ili Split!

Do viđenja!

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    Bok! Introduction with more words that I picked up.

    Another introduction, just using more words that i just picked up.
    Bok! Zovem se [1] Thatcher(,) [2] i želim govoriti hrvatski jezik. Sada govorim slabo, ali učim svaki dan. Stanujem u predgrađu (u) Minneapolisa, u Minnesoti, u Americi. [3] Učim kineski u školi, ali ne govorim kineski također tako dobro. Hrvatski nije prost [4] jezik, ali mislim da nije jako težak. Nemam učitelja za hrvatski jezik, [5] ali učim mnogo. Možda otputujem [6] u Zagreb(u) ili Split!

    Do viđenja!

     

     

     

    [1] "Zvati" means "to call, to invite"; "zvati se" is "to be named" (literally means "to call oneself").

     

    [2] Unlike English, there's no comma before "i" (and) in Croatian.

     

    [3] "Predgrađe + genitive". U Minnesoti, u Americi is locative case; you probably got confused because "u" can go with both accusative and locative, as well as genitive (but this is fairly rare). Locative from Latin locus (location); whereas accusative, in the context of orientation, denotes destination. English has a great distinction between those two: "u + locative" - in; "u + accusative" - into.


    [4] Although "prost" can also mean "jednostavan" (simple), the most common meaning became "unmannered, sweary". Many people don't use the word in first sense at all, so "jednostavan" might be a better choice in order to avoid confusion.


    [5] "Imati/nemati" in the sense of possession goes with accusative (not genitive, as Alma said), though you can use "nemati" with genitive, but it's pretty rare (this is something called Slavic genitive; when you negate a verb that goes with accusative, you can use genitive case instead of accusative). "Imati/nemati" go with genitive when you use them to denote the existence of something (there is/are).

    "Za" can go with a few different cases, but in this case you use it with accusative.


    [6] "Možda putujem" would be translated as "maybe I'm travelling"; I'm guessing you wanted to say "perhaps I'll travel", then it's better to use either future tense or present of a perfective verb. In English, you denote the verbal aspect by using its simple or continuous form, but in Croatian the verbs already are either perfective ("simple") or imperfective ("continuous"), with some which can be both at the same time. "Otputovati" would best be translated as "to set on a journey", "to depart", whereas "putovati" would mean "to travel".

     

    Bok! Introduction with more words that I picked up.

    Another introduction, just using more words that i just picked up.
    Bok! Zovem Thatcher, i želim govoriti hrvatski jezik. Sada govorim slabo, ali učim svaki dan. Stanujem u predgrađu u Minneapolisu, u Minnesotu, u Americi. Učim kineski u školi, ali ne govorim kineski također tako dobro. Hrvatski nije prost jezik, ali mislim da nije jako težak. Nemam učitelja za hrvatski jezik, ali učim mnogo. Možda putujem u Zagreb ili Split!

    Do viđenja!

     

    prost - common meaning of this word in Croatian is "vulgar". It's better to say: "Hrvatski nije lak/jednostavan jezik"

    učitelja - with verbs "imati" and "nemati" you should use Genitiv case.

    u Americi - Nominative: Amerika, Genitive: Amerike, Dative: Americi, Locative: u Americi This sound change is called sibilarizacija/assibilation.

     

    Feel free to ask me if you need any help. I will be glad to help

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