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Combining the quote (다고) and "and" (고) in Korean

Hello everyone,

I am wondering how the difference between
1) giving a quotation and adding something else
and
2) giving a quotation in which several things are listed
is made in Korean.

Example of the first case (quoting something and adding something else) :
1) "He likes tea and he said that he lives in the house."

Example of the second case (quoting two sentences) :
2) "He said that he likes tea and that he lives in the house."

So, how would you differentiate those two sentences in Korean ?

Here are my guesses as to how to say that in Korean.

1) 차를 좋아하고 집에 산다고 했어요.

2) 차를 좋아한다고 집에 산다고 했어요.

Is that how it works ?

I'd like you to correct my interpretation of this sentence as well to see if I am right or wrong :

보고 싶다고 널 사랑한다고 나의 맘 너에게 말하고 싶어.

Is the correct translation

1) I want to tell you that I want to see you, that I love you and my heart
(Every verb refers to what I want to say)

or

2) I want to see you, I love you and I want to tell you my heart ?
(The only thing I want to say is "my heart")

I would think the correct translation is (1), since, if I understand well, all speech levels use the verb stem without any added ending (except the past marker if needed) + 고, the plain style included, which means that if 보고 싶다 wasn't a quotation, but an independent sentence, it would be 보고 싶고.

Is this right ? For example, in different speech levels, "I eat an apple and I watch a movie."

사과 먹고 영화 봐요. (Polite style)
사과 먹고 영화 봅니다. (Deferential style)
사과 먹고 영화 본다. (Plain style)

If this is right, then is a verb ending with (으)ㄴ다고 necessarily part of a quotation, or can this ending have other meanings too ?

Thank you for reading my long question and for answering !

For learning: Korean
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    1.

    Example of the first case (quoting something and adding something else) :
    1) "He likes tea and he said that he lives in the house."
    (그는) 차를 좋아하고 집에 산다고 했어요. OR (그는) 차를 좋아하는 사람으로 집에 산다고 (말)했어요. (The latter would be the precise expression IMO.)

    Example of the second case (quoting two sentences) :
    2) "He said that he likes tea and that he lives in the house."
    (그는) 차를 좋아하고 집에 산다고 (말)했어요.

    2.

    보고 싶다고 널 사랑한다고 나의 맘 너에게 말하고 싶어.

    Is the correct translation

    1) I want to tell you that I want to see you, that I love you and my heart
    (Every verb refers to what I want to say)

    or

    2) I want to see you, I love you and I want to tell you my heart ?
    (The only thing I want to say is "my heart")

    I would think the correct translation is (1), since, if I understand well, all speech levels use the verb stem without any added ending (except the past marker if needed) + 고, the plain style included, which means that if 보고 싶다 wasn't a quotation, but an independent sentence, it would be 보고 싶고.

    -> CORRECT.

    3. If this is right, then is a verb ending with (으)ㄴ다고 necessarily part of a quotation, or can this ending have other meanings too ?

    Basically it's the problem of distinguishing between -(한)다고 and -고. As you mentioned well above, the former is used to quote, whereas the latter is used to connect phrases/sentences(the same as "and" in English).

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