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how to understand this pasage?and the subject is symptomatic or this mid-career crisis?

Symptomatic of this mid-career crisis are feelings of loneliness,increased consumption of alcohol and cigarettes,and generally poor physical condition.
According to a recent paper by Professor John Hunt of the London Business School,the groups most vulnerable to severe mid-career crisis are the civil service,banking,finance,and insurance.
how to understand this pasage?and the subject is symptomatic or this mid-career crisis?if the subject is symptomatic,why it is an adj not a noun?

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Other

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    The customary word order is reversed in this sentence. The normal order would be subject-verb-complement. In this sentence it is complemnent -verb-subject. If I were diagramming the sentence, I would consider the subject to be, “feelings of loneliness, increased consumption of alcohol and cigarettes, and generally poor physical condition,” the verb, “are” and the complement, “symptomatic of this mid-career crisis.” To put it simply: Feelings – are –symptomatic.



    "Symptomatic of A is/are B" = B is/are a symptom of A.
    For example: Sneezing and coughing are symptoms of a cold. OR Symptomatic of a cold are sneezing and coughing.

    This is a very academic and formal way of writing and isn't conversational at all. It is often used to talk about "conditions" and "symptoms" that are not literally medical diseases. Another example is this headline from the Financial Times that I found on Google: "Blackouts are symptomatic of what is wrong in India." The writer's meaning is that something is wrong in India (corruption, or poverty, or whatever) and the electrical failures are the result of this problem, and the blackouts are also evidence that this problem exists.

    You have asked a really good question. I have found all of the answers really helpful.

    If you want more details, you should go to the Web and type "subject-verb inversion."

    Here is an easy example from Wikipedia that I found:

    Regular order: The weather is worrisome.

    Inverted order: Worrisome is the weather.

    Therefore: the subject is "weather."

     

    Because it is written as a description of the noun "mid career crisis." You could write it as a noun : "Symptoms of this mid-career crisis are........). That was in normal order. In this case the subject is SYMPTOMS of this mid career crisis. But "symptomatic" IS an adjective, and thus not the subject. These results (lonliness, increased consumption of alcohol) are indications of a mid career crisis and are therefore the subjects. Thus, these results are indicative of a mid career crisis. Now replace indication with symptom and you have it. These results are symptoms of a mid career crisis. Thus, these results are symptomatic of a mid career crisis. It's just another way of expressing the same thought, using the adjective symptomatic. I hope that helps. It's really just a fancy way of writing, which you noticed. It sounds very different, and that's kind of the point (like a flashy dress to attract attention and stand out, only it's fancy syntax).

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