Site Feedback

Undecided questions
Please help me to differ these sentence. Thanks.

1) Everything you ever wanted to know is written in this book.

2) Everything you have ever wanted to know is written in this book.

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Other

Share:

0 comments

    Please enter between 2 and 2000 characters.

     

    Answers

    Sort by:

    The statements are the same. The second statement is slightly more formal. 1) would be more likely to be used by an American speaker, 2) by a Commonwealth English speaker.

    The meanings are the same. The only difference is a slightly different sense in the mind of the writer.

    Use the Simple Past to express the idea that an action started and finished at a specific time in the past. Sometimes, the speaker may not actually mention the specific time, but they do have one specific time in mind.

    We use the Present Perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. The exact time is not important. You CANNOT use the Present Perfect with specific time expressions such as: yesterday, one year ago, last week, when I was a child, when I lived in Japan, at that moment, that day, one day, etc. We CAN use the Present Perfect with unspecific expressions such as: ever, never, once, many times, several times, before, so far, already, yet, etc.

    http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/verbtenseintro.html

     

    In what way do you want to differentiate these sentences? It terms of meaning?

     

    The meanings are the same. They refer to questions from various unspecified times in the past, and the second phrase is more formal.

     

    1) Everything you ever wanted to know is written in this book.

    2) Everything you have ever wanted to know is written in this book.

    They mean the same thing.

    You can use ever for future tense if you put Want in it's infinitive form. (Everything you could ever want to know is written in this book.). However because of the ED at the end: wantED, we know it is referring to the past. And because "ever" is used for an indefinite time in the past, we know these sentences refer to unspecified times in the past. Because "ever" can refer to times in the present, the past and the future, you have to look at the structure around it to see what it refers to. In this case it is surrounded by past tense verbs, so aha, it is ever, in the past, so it refers to an unspecified time in the past. http://www.onestopenglish.com/community/your-english/word-grammar/your-english-word-grammar-ever/156945.article

    Submit your answer


    Please enter between 2 and 2000 characters.

    If you copy this answer from another italki answer page, please state the URL of where you got your answer from.