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Can anyone tell me the differences among the four sentences?

1. I made her leave.
2. I had her leave.
3.I got her to leave.
4. I let her leave.

I understand "make," "have," "get," and "let" are all causative verbs, which literally mean, they all make something happen. As a non-native speaker, however, it really perplexes me what they really mean.

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    The first 3 are much more similar as they all essentially mean 'I caused her to leave'

    The 4th one however means 'She chose to leave and I didn't stop her'

      OOPT

    1, 2 and 3 are indeed similar, but "I made her leave" can be either voluntary or involuntary, while 2 and 3 are clearly voluntary, i.e. the person made a special effort to make her leave.

    Voluntary: She was distrupting the class, so I made her leave.
    Involuntary: I was being a bit annoying. I think I made her leave.

     

    Vivian:

    You are searching for answers as to the origin of useages that are vague for anyone to comprehend.

    Take the use of "get" for example. I never actually "obtain" anything, when I "get" someone to go. We also have a common expression like this:

    "I got even with him or her." I did not actually obtain anything, but it means that I felt wronged by someone, and I did something to either wound them emotionally, or physically, or which otherwise "gets" them to feel unhappy.

    I think you are looking too deep into the "meanings". They are usages which have become common perhaps for longer than a hundred years in places like America.

    Here's another example. You sometimes see people in American (and students of English also) use the expression PRETTY, as in:

    It was PRETTY good
    It was a PRETTY convincing argument.
    It was PRETTY much a disaster....etc.

    The proper term would be to use VERY. Yet, many Americans have become so accustomed to hearing this, that they frequently use PRETTY when they should use VERY in speech and in writing. I've seen students write essays here using PRETTY.

    So what you see is that these are colloquialisms. Which is to say that common citizenry can being practicing a phrase or term until it becomes a social convention. There is no real "reason" for it, nor is there a grammatical foundation for its adoption.

    The same goes for the appearance of slang such as "Wanna" which I have also seen students use for "Want To" or "Gonna" for "Going to".

    Add to these facts, that Americans are a rebellious people, and break "rules" and conventions just for fun, and you can see why we use slang like "Ain't" which means "is not" just about any time we feel like it. Sometimes, we use slang just because if "feels good".

    Even though I write formally all the time, just a week ago I wrote to one fellow, the grammatically incorrect statement; "IT DON'T MAKE NO NEVERMIND TO ME."

    So as a student, you must be mindful, not to pursue every colloquialism as though it were the demonstration of a grammatical rule. That is why I suggest that students of English study songs first, so that as a teacher, I can show you some basic "slang" and also show you, after you can speak casually with, me, that there is an entirely different way to write English that is far and above spoken English.

    This shows why it looks to me, to be such a labor, for students to watch American TV shows, and learn English from it. For one thing, you probably can't get a written transcript. For another, the dialogue is probably at about the level of 6th to 8th grade middle school student. Furthermore, the student ends up trying to understand many expressions that are improper to use in many social situations.

    So keep in mind that there are not always reasons, other than convention, whose foundation in history is long lost.

    ----Warm Regards, Bruce

     

    Vivian:

    You are searching for answers as to the origin of useages that are vague for anyone to comprehend.

    Take the use of "get" for example. I never actually "obtain" anything, when I "get" someone to go. We also have a common expression like this:

    "I got even with him or her." I did not actually obtain anything, but it means that I felt wronged by someone, and I did something to either wound them emotionally, or physically, or which otherwise "gets" them to feel unhappy.

    I think you are looking too deep into the "meanings". They are usages which have become common perhaps for longer than a hundred years in places like America.

    Here's another example. You sometimes see people in American (and students of English also) use the expression PRETTY, as in:

    It was PRETTY good
    It was a PRETTY convincing argument.
    It was PRETTY much a disaster....etc.

    The proper term would be to use VERY. Yet, many Americans have become so accustomed to hearing this, that they frequently use PRETTY when they should use VERY in speech and in writing. I've seen students write essays here using PRETTY.

    So what you see is that these are colloquialisms. Which is to say that common citizenry can being practicing a phrase or term until it becomes a social convention. There is no real "reason" for it, nor is there a grammatical foundation for its adoption.

    The same goes for the appearance of slang such as "Wanna" which I have also seen students use for "Want To" or "Gonna" for "Going to".

    Add to these facts, that Americans are a rebellious people, and break "rules" and conventions just for fun, and you can see why we use slang like "Ain't" which means "is not" just about any time we feel like it. Sometimes, we use slang just because if "feels good".

    Even though I write formally all the time, just a week ago I wrote to one fellow, the grammatically incorrect statement; "IT DON'T MAKE NO NEVERMIND TO ME."

    So as a student, you must be mindful, not to pursue every colloquialism as though it were the demonstration of a grammatical rule. That is why I suggest that students of English study songs first, so that as a teacher, I can show you some basic "slang" and also show you, after you can speak casually with, me, that there is an entirely different way to write English that is far and above spoken English.

    This shows why it looks to me, to be such a labor, for students to watch American TV shows, and learn English from it. For one thing, you probably can't get a written transcript. For another, the dialogue is probably at about the level of 6th to 8th grade middle school student. Furthermore, the student ends up trying to understand many expressions that are improper to use in many social situations.

    So keep in mind that there are not always reasons, other than convention, whose foundation in history is long lost.

    ----Warm Regards, Bruce

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