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Does it sound native?

I check the phrases below on the Internet and in dictionaries but still have questions. I need advice of natives))

I possess a degree. I know this verb is used in this meaning (google gives countless page) but does it sound good and native?
an idea turned up - when I have a nice though suddenly
make a lot of efforts. May I use a lot with this phrase? Does it not sound too colloquial because of a lot? I need a official style. How to put it another way if it is not good?
My favorite amusement is the theatre. May I use Amusement here? Hobby is not good in the context. Something that entertain me a lot, make me think and give pleasure.
romantic idea - may I use it if it doesn't concern love and romance. For ex. I have a romantic idea to live in mountains? If it is not good how can I replace it?
part-time teacher - a teacher who visits a university and gives some lectures
what I am worth? May I use it if I mean my personal features and character? (not relating to a job or an employer). How strong I am or smart, etc.
I am eager to witness this performance. Not just watch but because it is so great for me to see it would me as if it's a miracle. In this meaning.
Grades of your diploma do not do credit to you though I am still proud of you. Does Do not do credit sound good?
Thank you very much in advance

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    I possess a degree sounds vague. Most native speakers would say for example: I have a Masters [ degree] in Administration/ Commerce/ Science etc.

    an idea turned up = when I have any thought about something suddenly

    to make a lot of effort = is correct

    My main interest lies in the theatre /I am really interested in the theatre is a better way of saying this.

    romantic idea - may I use it if it doesn't concern love and romance? No , but you can say: I have this romanticized idyll of living in the mountains OR I have this sentimental idea/notion about living in the mountains

    a part-time teacher = a teacher who works part time in schools, e.g. 3 days a week
    a visiting professor/lecturer = visits a university and gives some lectures
    a casual lecturer = a lecturer who works part time or on a short contract at a university and gives some lectures/tutorials

    What I am worth? is an expression about yourself used relating to your job or an employer.

    I am eager to see this performance/film. = means that you really want to see this because it is special or has received excellent reviews

    Your grades/your diploma do not do you any credit , but I am still proud
    of you. = that even though that person has not received good grades, you are still very happy with his/her effort and you are proud of him/her

    "I possess a degree"is very formal, probably too formal for today. For any situation, even when you are applying for a job, you can simply say, "I have a degree in [subject]."

    By the way, I think it's great that you looked this up on Google. Google can be a great tool for questions like these! You can also use Google to get ideas about which verbs are more frequent. For example, on my computer, "I possess a degree" gets 290,000 pages which is a lot. But "I have a degree" gets 34 million, which is really a lot!

    an idea turned up - when I have a nice though suddenly: Yes, exactly

    make a lot of efforts: This is fine except it's "effort" (no S). "A lot" is fine.

    You could say that your favorite pastime (not amusement) is going to the theater.

    Instead of "romantic idea," you can just say "I have a dream to live in the mountains."

    "Visiting professor" or "visiting lecturer" is better than part-time teacher. Part-time only refers to the number of hours of work per week, not how long you have been an employee.

    "What I am worth" usually relates only to a job or an employer. You can talk about "my self-worth" -- this is closer to your meaning.

    I am eager to witness this performance: This is fine if the event really means a lot to you. But be careful, people sometimes use this expression sarcastically when they think the performance is going to be a failure.

    Grades of your diploma do not do credit to you though I am still proud of you: As Jura said, I think this should be "your grades do not do you any credit" or "your diploma does not do you any credit." A diploma usually doesn't have grades on it but you could say "the grades on your transcript" or "the grades on your report card." A transcript is a document that shows all of the grades you received at your university or (perhaps) your secondary school. A report card is what children get at the end of each school term.

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