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What is the meaning of this sentence?

I've never mugged in. I've always been ever so slightly shunned.
By my lot, your lot.
Not quite up there.
You get used to it out on a limb, not quite up there enough.


What does it mean "You get used to it out on a limb, not quite up there enough" in this context?


Thanks in advance for your help :)

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    Best Answer - Chosen by Voting
    "You get used to it out on a limb, not quite up there enough".

    This sentence doesn't mean anything in English. "Out on a limb" is an idiom that means "in a dangerous position or at risk". The rest of the sentence makes no sense.

    I suspect it's someone using poetic license or playing with words if it's something you read/heard somewhere.

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