Site Feedback

Resolved questions
He begins to think he was wrong, that the case has nothing to do with her.

He begins to think he was wrong, that the case has nothing to do with her.

I understand its meaning, of course, but can't understand it grammatically. First, I thought the second clause is an appositive to the noun clause "he was wrong", but their relationship is not the one which appositive can do, moreover I'm not sure if clauses can be placed in parallel in apposition. Then I began to think that the adjective "wrong" let the sentence written like this. My poor theory is that "wrong" is one of the adjectives applied the syntax "it is … that …", so maybe those adjectives can create sentences like above. If so the sentences bellow are to be correct.

He was wise(,) that he made millions.
The document is important(,) that you have to keep it with you all the time.

Am I correct? And if so, this usage is pretty common one for the native people?

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

Share:

0 comments

    Please enter between 2 and 2000 characters.

     

    Answers

    Sort by:

     

    Best Answer - Chosen by the Asker
    It's a hundred times simpler than you think. Read it as a short list in quick succession.

    He begins to think...
    - (that) he was wrong, (and)
    - that the case has nothing to do with her.

    Unfortunately, your own examples won't make much sense without adding "so" before the adjective.

    Submit your answer


    Please enter between 2 and 2000 characters.

    If you copy this answer from another italki answer page, please state the URL of where you got your answer from.

     

    More resolved questions for learning English