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I am very perplexed by the following sentence:

 

"Here's some really nice cheese that I don't think you will have tasted before."

Could anyone explain to me the grammar of this? What kind of tense is this?

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    Best Answer - Chosen by the Asker
    The tense used here is called the future perfect. The usual use of this tense is to talk about a time in the future when certain actions/events will be finished. For example, "This time next year, I will have finished my course."

    In the sentence you have given, this tense is used in a perfectly acceptable idiomatic way and means something slightly different: "Here's some really nice cheese that I don't think you will have tasted before." - you could paraphrase this as: "Here's some really nice cheese that I am confident/sure you have not tasted before." As I said, this is a perfectly acceptable and common use of the future perfect tense.

    where did you get this sentence?

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