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I have some questions about the following essay.
(http://www.putclub.com/html/course/classic/newconcept/book3/2008/0927/7350.html)

(Question 1) In the first sentence, which phrase is better expression between "courts of law" and "law"?
(Question 2) Can I change the second sentence as "There are many instances when justice does not cease to be an abstract concept." Are there any better expressions?
(Question 3) Is the word 'muffed' typo of 'muffled' in the sentence of "Towards midday, a girl heard a muffed cry......"?
(Question 4) Is sentence ".......she ran to tell the manager who promptly rang up the fire brigade." right? There is time lag between the two parts, before and after, of the relative pronoun 'who'. Is it solved by the adverb 'promptly?'

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Justice was done(NCE3 L35)

The word justice is usually associated with courts of law. (skip)
There are rare instances when justice almost ceases to be an abstract concept. (skip)

Additional Details:

(Continue) When a thief was caught on the premises of large jewellery store on morning, the shop assistants must have found it impossible to resist the temptation to say 'it serves him right.' (skip) Towards midday, a girl heard a muffed cry coming from behind one of the walls. As the cry was repeated several times, she ran to tell the manager who promptly rang up the fire brigade. (skip)

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: Language

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    1) "courts of law" is the better expression. "law" can refer to many things: laws of physics, laws of grammar, moral laws, etc. Also, justice is usually executed in the court system. So it is best to be specific and say "courts of law".

    2) No, you can't change it. The written text is saying that the "status quo" is that law is an abstract concept. And only rarely does it cease (stop) being that. Your sentence: "There are many instances when justice does not cease to be an abstract concept." - it is too complicated. "cease" means "stop", so "does not cease" means "does not stop", which is the same thing as "continues". So you are saying ""There are many instances when justice continues to be an abstract concept." = "Justice is an abstract concept." When you talk about a "rare instance", it is like the exception to a rule. So you need to emphasize that it is rare. Sorry, this is very complicated to explain.

    3) Yes, it should be "muffled". It appears to be a typo.

    4) ".......she ran to tell the manager who promptly rang up the fire brigade." is correct. There are two parts: 1) she ran to tell the manager; 2) the manager rang up the fire brigade. If you use "promptly", it means the second part happened immediately after the first part. "who" is used to joined the two sentences together.

    she ran to tell the manager
    +
    the manager promptly rang up the fire brigade
    =
    she ran to tell the manager, who promptly rang up the fire brigade

    You can use "who" to combine the sentences into one and avoid repeating the noun "manager".

    (Question 1) Use "courts of law". The word "law" is too general.
    (Question 2) Yes, this wording is verbose. It would be enough to say "the law is a living thing".
    (Question 3) Yes, I think it is a typo.
    (Question 4) A comma is necessary after manager. There is only one manager. The rest is parenthetical, requiring a comma.

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