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Could anyone give examples about formal English and informal English? (words,phrases,etc)

as many as possible,thank you

For learning: English
Base language: English
Category: WK087

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    In English, there aren't as strict rules as there are for some other languages: Korean, for instance.

    In English, it is considered more polite to not merge words when speaking to adults (for instance, "I need to" is more polite than "I needa". Mary gave a few other examples of popular English phrases that are often mixed.

    Then, there is "thanks/thank you". Thanks is more informal, and can be used for adults, but "thank you" is more polite.
    In English, there aren't too many rules about formalities: you say hello and hi to everybody, hey seems to be more playful. Also, yup is a bit informal. Yeah and yes area bit formal, yes being the most formal. They can be used for friends,too, I personally say yeah more than anything.

    Really, that's about it. Other than that, to be polite, you use manners like saying thank you, you're welcome, so on so forth. Basically, being curteous.

    I'll comment again if I remember anything I might of forgotten.
    I wanna speak english, I gonna work, kinda that are informal for example. I want to speak, I am going to work, Kind of that are formal.

    formal english i think (correct me if am wrong)
    are those phrases or sentences that stated in right grammar...
    while informal are those phrases which you can state anything as long as you will be understand by others....

    Examples: (colloquial english)
    got to= gotta
    want to= wanna
    going to= gonna
    C U/cya= see you
    x x= kisses
    ect....

    part one

    Basically, formal English is what you find in the English dictionary, academic writing, newspapers, business letters, and so forth. Informal English is mostly slang (those of you who don't know what slang is can look it up at www.google.com) and / or a greater or smaller percentage of our day-to-day spoken language).

    I will give some examples here, but if you really want to learn informal English, listen to a lot of rap music, or hip hop in general (or "hippity hop" in the words of the actress Irma P. Hall in 'the Ladykillers', a film also starring Tom Hanks and Marlon Wayans) - my personal favourite rap singers are Kayne West, Mos Def, and Coolio. 50 cent uses a LOT of informal English, and I like some of his songs (and the film 'get rich or die trying', with 50 cent himself as main actor!), my only qualm with him being that some of his lyrics (from what I can understand) are sexist.

    informal ......................................... formal
    ain't .................................. isn't ("is not" is even more formal - only for school essays and the like)
    gonna ................................. going to
    wanna ................................ want to
    wassup (what's up, or what's happening) ...... what's new / how are you?
    rat ........................... a tattletale (or someone who denounces - 'tells on' somebody else)
    scab ........................ people who go to a workplace to fill in for workers who are on strike
    sucker ..................... credulous
    pissed .................... drunk (Britain); angry (US)

    part 2

    everything seemed hunky-dory............ everything seemed fine (old slang but still used)
    the fuzz (or the cops)........................ the police
    crib ....................... house (rap)
    little squirt ............. (offensive) a small child
    kid ......................... child (common usage - comes from kid = baby goat)
    hunk ...................... a man (used approvingly by women - e.g. 'what a hunk of a man')
    broad .................... what an Italian gangster would use for 'woman' in a gangster film.
    lovey-dovey ............. romantic (like two doves in love)
    me and my homies .... (rap) my friends and I
    to kick the bucket ..... to die
    small fry (noun) / small-time (adjective) .... unimportant

    Then there is also a vast range of 'substitute words' called Cockney rhyming slang. Basically, Cockney is the English spoken in one of London's poor neighborhoods, and it is very rich in slang, but a slang that has a structure of its own: a suit is called a whistle, because instead of saying 'suits', they would say 'whistles and flutes' (I don't know when or why that began, but it is fun, and it sounds cool!). Chairs: 'ladders and stairs' (thus a room 'with a table and a ladder' in it would actually be one with a table and a chair, ha ha).

    It even spread to common American slang, for example in the expression 'to get down to brass tacks' (to get down to the facts - most Americans don't know it, but the expression came from the Cockney rhyming slang 'brass tacks' for 'facts'). Not to be confused with high brass, which is a high military rank, because of the medals, some of which are made of ... brass.
    For some examples of Cockney rhyming slang, here is a good site:
    http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/cockney_rhyming_slang
    You can find all sorts of slang dictionaries (both on the internet and as books). I will not post any links here because there is quite a lot of foul language in most of them...

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