Maria
I didn't like school. I didn't want to learn something. I could to be silent all school day and didn't answer teachers. But in 6th class I desided that I want to be the best students in school. I started to leart a lot of time. And year after year I improved my grades. I finished a school the best student. It was my victory))
Feb 20, 2021 7:20 PM
Corrections · 3
I didn't like school when I was young. I didn't want to learn anything. I could be silent the whole school day and didn't answer teachers' questions. But in 6th class, (sxith grade) I decided that I wanted to be one of the best students in school. I started to study a lot. And year after year I improved my grades. I finished school the best student. We would say, "When I graduated, I was the student with the highest grades (the valedictorian)." It was my victory)) We would use the word "achievement" here. It was a big/huge achievement for me.
February 20, 2021
I didn't like school. I didn't want to learn something. I could to be silent all school day and didn't answer teachers. But in 6th class I desided that I want to be the best students in school. I started to leart a lot of time. And year after year I improved my grades. I finished a school the best student. It was my victory))
I used to not like school. I didn’t like learning. To be honest, I could be silent all day and not answer a single question. That all changed in 6th class. I decided that I wanted to be one of the best students in the entire school, catching up and learning a lot. Since then, I’ve steadily improved my grades. I finished the school year as an exceptional student. I’m proud of my journey.
February 20, 2021
Notes on your English: - The phrase “didn’t want to learn something” is really unclear. What is the “something”? - I hope I can explain this clearly - when it comes to answering a question in class, we consider it “answering a question”, not “answering a teacher”. That’s because the question is usually on the teacher’s material, not from the teacher themself. An exceptional example would be something like, “I went out for coffee with my chemistry professor. She invited me to do research on protons and asked me a bunch of touch questions. I answered each one with ease.” - Decided is spelt “decided”. Real quick one. Sorry, it’s just weird English spelling. - In English, we usually don’t “finish school” unless you’re talking about a university degree or a post doctorate. We might occasionally say to “finish high school”, “finish middle school” - but the word you’re looking for is “graduate”. Ex., “I graduated from middle school at the top of my class.” - We’re really individualistic in English. That means that there are no “best students” in school, only people with top grades or high class rankings. You would say something like, “I’m proud to be the valedictorian, a top-ranking member of the Class of 2021.” - The last part, “It was my victory”, doesn’t make any sense. The word “victory” is usually only used in a combative context, like “The hockey game was challenging, but the front players led us to victory”. You could also use it in a historical context, like “Although the fight was bloody, the Romans were victorious in defending the siege.” Hope this helps! Have fun learning English!
February 20, 2021
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