Jessie💞Isabella
The linear school of communication studies emphasizes on communication effect. If the effect is different from or less than what was intended, this school tends to talk in terms of communication failure. The semiotic school thinks that that is irrelevant. For example, a couple of years ago, there was a TV show called “the voice of China”. It was very popular and earned lots of money. In its ad campaign, it says this show is changing the contestants’ life and making their dreams come true. However, when my brother, my sister, and I were watching this advertisement in my living room, we had three different ways of decoding these messages. My sister completely believed it and even wanted to give it a try. This is what Stuart Hall called “Dominant/hegemonic position”. Conversely, I didn’t buy it. As a middle-aged teacher of media studies, who tries to think critically, I know the tricks about advertising. It sounds impossible to me that just participating in a TV show would turn your life around. This is what Stuart Hall called “Oppositional position”. My brother was kind of taking an intermediate position. He agreed that this show changed their life to a degree, for example, a participant used to be a farmer, but now he was making much more money than before. Yet, he was not willing to completely accept the message the way the encoder intended. This is the so-called “Negotiated position”. Neither oppositional position nor negotiated position should be considered to be evidence of communication failure. According to semioticians, as the receiver, everyone has different experiences and interests, so naturally, we take different positions on decoding a message.
Feb 7, 2022 11:38 AM
Corrections · 2
The linear school of communication studies emphasizes communication effects. If the effect is different from or less than what was intended, this school tends to talk in terms of communication failure. The semiotic school thinks that that is irrelevant. For example, a couple of years ago, there was a TV show called “The Voice of China”. It was very popular and earned lots of money. In its ad campaign, it said this show was changing the contestants’ lives and making their dreams come true. However, when my brother, my sister, and I were watching this advertisement in my living room, we had three different ways of decoding these messages. My sister completely believed it and even wanted to give it a try. This is what Stuart Hall called the “Dominant/hegemonic position”. Conversely, I didn’t buy it. As a middle-aged teacher of media studies, who tries to think critically, I know the tricks about advertising. It sounded impossible to me that just participating in a TV show would turn your life around. This is what Stuart Hall called the “Oppositional position”. My brother was kind of taking an intermediate position. He agreed that this show changed their lives to a degree, for example, one participant used to be a farmer, but now he was making much more money than before. Yet, he was not willing to completely accept the message the way the encoder intended. This is the so-called “Negotiated position”. Neither the oppositional position nor the negotiated position should be considered to be evidence of communication failure. According to semioticians, as the receiver, everyone has different experiences and interests, so naturally, we take different positions on decoding a message.
Feb 7, 2022 6:19 PM
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