Richard-Business Eng
Professional Teacher
A short FUN English exercise... Part 1... try it

HUMOROUS ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRANSLATIONS

Translating from one language to another language is not always easy.
And the translations are often funny.

1. Read the English translations below
2. Try to re-write the translations

Have fun…

 

AT A HOTEL
- It is forbidden to steal towels please.


- You are invited to take advantage of the chambermaid.


- Because of the unpropriety of entertaining guests of the opposite sex in the bedroom, it is suggested that the lobby should be used for this purpose.


- If you want just condition of warm in your room, please control yourself.

 

IN AN ELEVATOR
- To move the cabin push button for wishing floor.

Nov 27, 2015 5:14 PM
Comments · 14

Thank you Richard! That made my day - keep them coming - eh :)

November 28, 2015

Richard, it is very simple. The words watch, clock and hour are equal in Russian.

- What time is it?

- (It is) 6 o'clock.

- (Is it) so late?

- It depends. (It is) late, but (it is) not so (late).

- Have you finished the Italki course?

- You bet.

November 28, 2015

Richard, and can you understand this funny dialogue of two Russian schoolchildren who are learning English and they are trying to speak English, instead of the Russian words they are using the English ones. Any Russian who knows a little English understands everything in this dialogue.

- Which watch?
- Six watches.
- Such much?
- Whom how. Much, but not such.
- Italki finished?
- Ask!

November 27, 2015

Ivanovich

Wow, that's interesting.

If this is a test, then I have to admit I will fail.

The only thing I can guess is that the kid asks the other kid what he is looking at, and the kid says he's looking at six things, and after that I cannot even begin to guess.

Maybe you could wait one day, and then tell us the answer.

Thanks for this great translation example... really interesting.

November 27, 2015

Sina...

So sorry to hear that you became a sausage :)

'becommen' looks like the English verb 'become'.

(actually ~40% of English is derived from Germanic languages)

 

So, what is the German verb 'to become'?

I hope it's not something like 'getten or receiven' :)

November 29, 2015
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