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Radoslav
How to determine which one to use? Present perfect or Simple Past?

Hi everyone. I face big difficulties which tense to use Present Perfect or Simple Past. Is there a methodology to help me differentiate them? 

When a specific time is used into the predicate, I have no problems, I just use simple past. Here  this is an example that induce a lot of frustration to me, because it seems to contradict one of the rules that define simple past tense. Consider this example:

    "I graduated from North Carolina State University with a bachelors degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering."

Why simple past? Why not: 
"I HAVE  graduated from North Carolina State University with a bachelors degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering."

Please help me to choose the right tense without ambiguity!

Thank you!

Aug 9, 2016 2:33 PM
Comments · 7

Sometimes the time of the simple past action is implied. This means that you don't see it in the same sentence, but you understand it from the context (ie. the time has usually been given already).

Could you please correct your own sentence? I've underlined the errors.

"But here some example that cast a frustration over me, cause I don't know where did this come from."


August 9, 2016

Radoslav

 

I understand why you are asking these questions about the present perfect tense... it is difficult to understand and not exactly easy to explain, but I wil try.

 

"I have been in London once."

It is true that it happened once (and the one visit is completed), but there is still the continuing chance that it may happen again, so the present perfect (not 'past perfect') tense is appropriate.

So yes, the present perfect tense is appropriate.

 

"I was in London once."

This talks about the one time that you visited London... it is simply a statement of fact.

It does not suggest that you may go there again.

But if you use the present perfect, it suggests that you may go again in the future:

"I have been in London once (and I may go again someday)."

 

Again, I hope this helps...

August 9, 2016

Radoslav... Paige said it best... you graduated ONCE (and the graduation did not continue).

 

The following is not a criticism, simply a couple of suggestions:

 

Hi everyone. I face big difficulties deciding which tense to use, the Present Perfect or Simple Past.

Is there a methodology to help me differentiate between them?

When a specific time is used into in the predicate, I have no problems, I just use the simple past.

Here this is an example that induces a lot of frustration to in me,

Here is an example/This is an example  that frustrates me

because it seems to contradict one of the rules that define the simple past tense.

 

Hope this helps...

August 9, 2016

Thank you @Richard.
Contemplating on your explaination " you graduated ONCE (and the graduation did not continue)" new questions emerge. For example:

I have been in London once.

Is the ^^above ^^ sentence grammatically correct? If yes, then it(being in London) happened once and it does not continue. But it is still Past Perfect.

August 9, 2016
Thank you all guys for helping me. @Peachey I tried to correct the phrases you HAD(may be this HAD shouldn't be here :-) ) underlined. 

I am open for more criticism :)

August 9, 2016
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Radoslav
Language Skills
Bulgarian, English, French
Learning Language
English, French