lin
if you study other language,you have to make a other language's name?

In chinese school, we must study english. our english teacher always say "you guys have to make a english name "

I always think yes, study other language should have a other language's name.but when i came to the campus,i changed my mind.

In the US. lot of japanese don't have english name.  Why? they don't want to into the American society? in internet,someone tell me ,beause they don't need change their name to into the American society.Japanese are proud of their own culture.so i thought, yeah.although,my names have some tone is difficult for someone who didn't speak  my language, but i shouldn't let me adapt to others,i should let others adapt to me. beause,my name is my family,my language,my country given me a gift. i should be proud of my name.

do you think i'm so serious? maybe just a name ,never mind. tell me you think.

ps. i know my English have some grammatical errors.i'm sorry for that. : )

Apr 3, 2017 7:11 AM
Comments · 10

I don't think that people should be forced to use a different name when they learn a foreign language. I agree with Evelyn that people should make an effort to spell and pronounce you name correctly - although, what is correct? Some names appear in the same or in similar spellings in different languages, but may be pronounced slightly differently.

I had many fellow Chinese students at university, and I found it sometimes confusing because at times I only knew a student's western name but not their "real" Chinese name. So sometimes there was confusion when I spoke to a Chinese student about another Chinese student, because they usually used each others Chinese names which I didn't know, and so I wasn't always sure at first if we were talking about the same person.

I also think that sometimes people consider the difficulties of pronouncing their name to be greater than they are. Most of the Chinese names I've encountered weren't that difficult to pronounce, although I'm sure something always gets lost since I don't know anything about tones - and a lot of people who don't speak or know a tonal language probably can't even hear the difference. I know it certainly takes me a while to hear the difference, getting it right myself takes a lot more pratice.

Another thing to consider is what name to pick: I think there was a topic about this issue before, but sometimes learners pick a western name which is highly unusual or not typically used as a name; that can cause confusion or ridicule as well. But what is anyone supposed to think when there are celebrities who name their babies Apple, Ocean and whatnot.

April 3, 2017

Hi Lin, 

I have only just started learning Chinese at university this year, and our teacher gave us the opportunity to choose if we wanted a Chinese name or not. I opted in because it made learning Chinese a little more real. I wouldn't say you'd have to take on an English (or any other) name if you didn't want to, but it does make it easier to connect with that culture, and for people to remember your name! 

April 3, 2017

Lin, 

I think you're quite right to be proud of your name, and of the pride in your family that it represents. I firmly believe each person's name is theirs to present to the world as they see fit. It is everyone else's responsibility to learn that name, spell it correctly, and pronounce it properly. 

So maybe you will be surprised when I tell you that Evelyn is not my real first name (it is my middle name). My first name includes a "th" sound, which many few non-native English speakers have trouble with. I feel bad whenever I introduce myself to someone,  and then immediately find myself trying to explain how to pronounce my name. If the person finds the "th" sound very difficult, it can be very frustrating for them, and that's not the way I like to start off a new friendship. "Evelyn" is fairly easy for most non-English speakers to pronounce, and so I use it as my "foreign languages" name. 

So I agree with you using your own name, and I would do my best to learn its proper tones; but I also appreciate the ease and practicality of using a name easily pronounced by people I want to meet and make friends with.


April 3, 2017
I'm a high school student studying at international school. The teachers made us choose an English name that easier to say for the foreign teachers. And I don't mind because I dont want every time they say my name incorrectly. Btw at my school if someone dont like to have English name it is fine and the teachers will try to pronounce their name maybe. 
April 3, 2017
i think you guys is right, for me ,i should have a English name, beause if i respect my foreign friendsi,i shouldn't make their too Embarrassing,and i also have a good solution,too. my english name is lynn,  lynn  pronunciation is the same as my Chinese name-lin . i'm so smart.LOL  
April 4, 2017
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