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Ju lia
Sergej Skripal

Hi,

I found this article about the Salisbury Attack and wondered what this means: 

You can finally put down the diplomatic Ferrero Rochers and hurl a few about instead. Actually don’t touch them, the Ferreros, they might be poisonous. Monsieur, with zis novi chocs Novitschok you are really killing us …

Could you please help me?

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/mar/26/russian-spy-assassins-the-salisbury-attack-review

Apr 5, 2018 1:31 PM
Comments · 5

put down the chocolates= stop being nice, stop offering chocolate to them.

start hurling them= "rocher" sounds a bit like "rock".  If you "hurl rocks" at someone, you say mean things about them and try to hurt them.  "Julie was hurling rocks at me all evening.  What did I say that upset her so much?"


novi chocs=new chocolates

Novitschok=Novichok=the poison that was used to kill Skripal.

If you say something is "killing you", you mean that it is so good, you might die from pleasure.  Here, though, it is literal.


SO:

You can finally put down the diplomatic Ferrero Rochers and hurl a few about instead.= You can stop being nice, and start being mean.

Actually don’t touch them, the Ferreros, they might be poisonous= However, if you actually go to a party with a Russian ambassador, don't start throwing the chocolates at him, because the chocolates might be poisoned, and you might die if you touch them.

The author then imagines a party with a Russian ambassador who offers poisoned chocolates to his guests.

A guest doesn't know the chocolates, enjoys them, and says

Monsieur, with zis novi chocs Novitschok you are really killing us = Sir, your new Novichok chocolates are excellent.
Then, presumably, the poison takes effect, and they die.


April 5, 2018

Hi Ju lia, I think I've got it. Ferrero Rochers are chocolate and hazelnuts confectioneries. In the UK in the 1990s there were commercial adverts in which an ambassador use to offer them during a party (you can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMlP_Moo0bE). It seems the advertising campaign was so popular (not necessarily in a positive sense) and parodied that sometimes journalists refer to it. Take a look:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/11407064/Being-a-good-diplomat-takes-more-than-Ferrero-Rocher.html

April 5, 2018

It's a travesty of a title of a film based on a book by the same title (so pick one). It was a spy movie, about looking for a mole in British Intelligence. A really good movie, by the way. The book supposedly too, but I haven't read it.

[Is it "a travesty"? That's how it's called? I might have mixed up the term, but it's a modification for sure] 

YYY, OK, you changed your question so my answer doesn't really apply. I won't delete it though. I enjoy reading my writing.

April 5, 2018

Wow Chris!

This is such a brilliant explanation, thank you so much! There were a lot more puns in it than I expected.

April 5, 2018

Ah, sorry @Grzybek, I only saw your answer afterwards! But thanks to both of you! This text is quiet difficult to translate :D Do you understand the part or "put down" and "hurl about" ? is it like now you can stop denying them and eat a handful of them?


April 5, 2018
Ju lia
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