sunseeker666
tongue twister bettey bought a bit of butter
Betty bought a bit of better butter. but,said she, this butter's bitter. if i put it in my batter,it'll make my batter bitter.
Why it says "but,said she" instead of "but she said" What is difference of this two expressions and feelings saying so?
Thank u.

Jun 11, 2020 3:52 AM
Comments · 3
We need quotation marks: Betty bought a bit of better butter. “But”, said she, “this butter's bitter....”

The quote is “but this butter’s bitter…”. “But” is part of the quote. “Said she” is not part of the original quote. We put "said she" in the middle as a stylistic choice. Since "said she" it comes after part of the quote, we usually use inversion.

By the way, if the batter was bitter, I’m not so sure it could be called “better”.

I like this one:
Betty bought a bit of bitter butter that made her batter bitter, so Betty bought a bit of better butter that made her batter better.

Sounds awesome in American accent ;)

Edit: Edited for a typo in the tongue-twister ;)
June 11, 2020
Phil is right, of course, about the inversion of <em>said </em>and <em>she </em>being a stylistic choice. Where the quote comes first, it is very common (and good style) to invert the verb and the subject. For example, here is a conversation in the opening chapter of 'Hard Times':

<em>‘Girl number twenty,’ said Mr. Gradgrind, squarely pointing with his square forefinger, ‘I don’t know that girl. Who is that girl?’</em>
<em>‘Sissy Jupe, sir,’ explained number twenty, blushing, standing up, and curtseying.</em>
<em>‘Sissy is not a name,’ said Mr. Gradgrind. ‘Don’t call yourself Sissy. Call yourself Cecilia.’</em>
<em>‘It’s father as calls me Sissy, sir,’ returned the young girl in a trembling voice, and with another curtsey.</em>
<em>‘Then he has no business to do it,’ said Mr. Gradgrind. </em>
[Charles Dickens, London, 1854]

As you can see, the verb comes before the subject in each case.

<em>Betty bought a bit of bitter butter that made her batter bitter, so Betty bought a bit of better butter that made her batter better.</em>
<em>Sounds awesome in American accent ;) </em>
[ Phil, @italki, 2020]

I'm sure it does sound awesome: a growling torrent of b and r sounds! <em> </em>So different from the pitter-patter raindrops of British English....

June 11, 2020
La Liseuse:
I love your "the pitter-patter raindrops of British English...." (meaning proper RP, and not Cockney or some accent from northern or western England, presumably ;)
June 13, 2020
sunseeker666
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English