G.O.L.D
Could you please answer this Job interview question?
What would you do if you disagreed with the way your manager wanted you to handle a situation or problem?

Jun 21, 2020 3:34 PM
Comments · 12
It definitely depends on what exactly it is that we disagree on, but for things where I disagree with an approach but there's not necessarily a moral component to it, I would ask my manager to explain their reasoning for recommending their approach. Depending on who else is present, I might do that in private or in front of others - obviously I do not want to embarrass my manager or make it seem like we are not aligned.
In the conversation, I would challenge their assumptions that made them believe their chosen approach is the best one and make a proposal for an approach that I find more fitting. Then we could constructively discuss about the pros and cons of each approach and list the trade-offs that come with each of them. Usually, in the course of this talk, the argument gets settled and one person can successfully persuade the other one of their approach.
June 21, 2020
if the manager is suggesting that you "handle a situation to a problem" that is morally or legally in question, tell her/ him that you disagree (and state your reasons why you disagree). If that does not change the trajectory of your discussion notify superiors or human resources, and if that doesn't work, start looking for another job. good luck
June 21, 2020
First, if the employee believes that the manager's order is not compliant with the Health and Safety (H&S) law, then the employee would have the legal right to initiate a "work refusal". Then the employee, the employee's H&S representative or the employer would be required to contact the governmental ministry or department, and a H*S inspector would investigate the work refusal, and render a decision that would have to be complied with by the employee and/or the manager.

However, if the manger's order to the employee did not present or involve a H&S danger, then perhaps the best way to deal with the employee's concern would be to have the employee state his or her objection or concern, in writing, directly to the manager only, and await the manager's response.

Hope this helps a little...


June 21, 2020
Just get on with the job I'm paid to do and handle the situation as instructed, by the manager.

Then later after the interview and if you get the job and your manger wants you to do something illegal or immoral and unethical, then you can react according to your conscious.
The question is/was only about a difference of opinion on handling a situation, do not read more into the question than there is to read, or hear in this case.
June 26, 2020
Allow me to correct the order of my two comments.

First, if the manger's order to the employee did not present or involve a H&S danger, then the best way to deal with the employee's concern would be to have the employee state his or her objection or concern, in writing, directly to the manager only, and await the manager's response. 

Here in Canada, employers (including managers) are required by law to ensure that a worker/employee has received Worker Health and Safety Awareness Training before they are permitted to work in any workplace.
The cost of training is borne by the business and the employee may not work until such training has been carried out.
If the job candidate can demonstrate that they have received the Awareness training at a previous workplace, the employer is not required to repeat the training and therefore can put the job applicant to work on day one plus save the cost of the training.

Employers, at least in Canada, would be more likely to hire an applicant who had already received the training and had a good knowledge of the H&S laws.

On reflection, my two comments were written in the wrong order. But at least in Canada, and in a job application interview, both answers would be acceptable and the applicant with an understanding of the H&S laws would have a definite advantage over an applicant who had not been trained in H&S.

Furthermore, I should have emphasized the first course of action (i.e., deliberation with the manager), while adding that knowledge of the H&S laws (questions usually asked in Canadian job interviews) would benefit the applicant (assuming the company and their managers supported and complied with the H&S laws).

My two comments were in the wrong order, but neither incorrect, nor an overreaction, at least here in Canada.

My comments are based on 28 years of consulting hundreds of companies, writing H&S policies, and training more than 30,000 managers and workers in more than 30 H&S topics, including the law.
June 21, 2020
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G.O.L.D
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