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" Lord "
All idioms which begin with the letter " A " part 3 All in your head
    If something is all in your head, you have imagined it and it is not real.
All mod cons
    If something has all mod cons, it has all the best and most desirable features. It is an abbreviation of 'modern convenience' that was used in house adverts.
All mouth and trousers
    (UK) Someone who's all mouth and trousers talks or boasts a lot but doesn't deliver. 'All mouth and no trousers' is also used, though this is a corruption of the original.
All my eye and Peggy Martin
    (UK) An idiom that appears to have gone out of use but was prevalent in the English north Midlands of Staffordshire, Cheshire and Derbyshire from at least the turn of the 20th century until the early 1950s or so. The idiom's meaning is literally something said or written that is unbelievable, rumor, over embellished, the result of malicious village gossip etc.
All of the above
    This idiom can be used to mean everything that has been said or written, especially all the choices or possibilities.
All over bar the shouting
    When something is all over bar the shouting, the outcome is absolutely certain.('All over but the shouting' is also used.)
All over the map
    (USA) If something like a discussion is all over the map, it doesn't stick to the main topic and goes off on tangents.
All over the place
    If something is completely disorganised or confused, it is all over the place.
All over the shop
    If something is completely disorganised or confused, it is all over the shop.
All over the show
    If something is all over the show, it's in a complete mess.An alternative to 'All over the shop'.
All roads lead to Rome
    This means that there can be many different ways of doing something.
All set
    If you're all set, you are ready for something.
All sixes
    If something is all sixes, it doesn't matter how it's done; it's the same as 'six of one and half a dozen of the other'.
All skin and bone
    If a person is very underweight, they are all skin and bone, or bones.
All square
    If something is all square, nobody has an advantage or is ahead of the others.
All talk and no trousers
    (UK) Someone who is all talk and no trousers, talks about doing big, important things, but doesn't take any action.
All that glitters is not gold
    This means that appearances can be deceptive and things that look or sound valuable can be worthless. ('All that glistens is not gold' is an alternative.)
All the rage
    If something's all the rage, it is very popular or fashionable at the moment.
All the tea in China
    If someone won't do something for all the tea in China, they won't do it no matter how much money they are offered.
All your eggs in one basket
    If you put all your eggs in one basket, you risk everything at once, instead of trying to spread the risk. (This is often used as a negative imperative- 'Don't put all your eggs in one basket'. 'Have your eggs in one basket' is also used.)
All's fair in love and war
    This idiom is used to say that where there is conflict, people can be expected to behave in a more vicious way.
All's well that ends well
    If the end result is good, then everything is good.
All-singing, all-dancing
    If something's all-singing, all-dancing, it is the latest version with the most up-to-date features.
Alter ego
    An alter ego is a very close and intimate friend. It is a Latin phrase that literally means 'other self'.
Always a bridesmaid, never a bride
    If someone is always a bridesmaid, never a bride, they never manage to fulfill their ambition- they get close, but never manage the recognition, etc, they crave.
Ambulance chaser
    A lawyer who encourages people who have been in accidents or become ill to sue for compensation is an ambulance chaser.
Amen
    Some use 'Amen' or 'Amen to that' as a way of agreeing with something that has just been said.
An apple a day keeps the doctor away
    Eating healthy food keeps you healthy.
An old flame
    An old flame is a person that somebody has had an emotional, usually passionate, relationship with, who is still looked on fondly and with affection.
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure
    This expression means that is is better to try to avoid problems in the first place, rather than trying to fix them once they arise.
And all that jazz
    This idiom means that everything related or similar is included.
Angry as a bear
    If someone is as angry as a bear, they are very angry.('Angry as a bear with a sore foot' is also used.)
Angry as a bull
    If someone is as angry as a bull, they are very angry.

Sep 15, 2008 5:06 PM
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" Lord "
Language Skills
Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, Russian
Learning Language
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, Russian