Doris Day Δωρίς
How to regain your passion in learning the language you are studying?

I am losing the will to continue learning the language that I am learning because lessons are getting difficult ~.~`. It seems like that my brain has no space for new vocabularies (I know this is not true. ). I am busy with my work and university

Those are just mere reasons what I am just trying to say my passion is lost but the love and want is there.


"The spirit is willing but the mind/body is weak">_< 

Apr 20, 2014 2:58 AM
Comments · 7

"my passion is lost but the love and want is there" this is a very interesting sentence.  It's like a person who wants to lose weight. Your passion to go excersice is gone but the love and want to lose weight is there. (I think we all have that want to lose weight hehe) 

 

The answer is simple. You have to keep at it. If you want it go get it. Learning a language is not easy but you are in control of your learning process every step of the way. 

 

For example I goto the gym 5 days a week to workout. Many times my brain is trying to trick myself into not going. Thinking of one reason or another but I still go even if that day's workout was not my best. The most important thing is to keep going. Doing this I find my passion for working out comes back now and again.

 

You say your passion is lost. Now you need a new tool to help you learn the language it's called motivation.  And that is something you must find within yourself.

 

I think the key to regain your language learning passion can be put into two sentences:

 

Keep at it. If you want it go get it.

April 20, 2014

I had a very large break from Chinese study, where I practised what I knew with native-speakers and generally used the language... but did not improve or put much effort in.

 

I was tired, I had a lot of stress and responsibility that took over my energy. After I removed that stress, and relaxed for a month or so... 

 

Then, I applied for studys in my language in Taiwan, and wanted to be fluent enough to completely refuse to use English in day to day life. I want to immerse myself. This is only several short months away, and that target has caused some profound changes in the way I live my life.

 

Now I have 2 hours a week study with an excellent teacher. I almost exclusively use my target language with my girlfriend, in both SMS and real-life conversations. I teach low level students English, who constantly need translations (I feel like I learn more Chinese in a lesson than they learn English... strange education system). I am listening to lots of music, and listening to the words more. I am starting to appreciate karaoke, if for nothing else than the Chinese lesson side of it (even if it is traditional characters). 

 

So, I would recommend you set a goal? Not an abstract future goal, but one close enough and solid enough to galvanise your interest and force you to take a serious look at how you are currently studying... and trying to improve it.

April 20, 2014

If you're busy and stressed a little holiday might be the best thing.

 

You could try doing something fun and relaxing in your target language, something that has nothing to do with verb conjugation and correct spelling but will relax you and give you the feeling that this is a nice language to do nice things with.

I like  watching a movie or reading a book that I love dubbed, subtitled or translated in the other language. I already know what happens in the movie or in the book so I don't have to stress about whether I understand everything, I can just enjoy and be happy about everything I managed to understand.

 

 

 

April 20, 2014

I have gone through similar periods. There was even a time when I had taken a break from learning Japanese for a few years while I was practicing Aikido Japanese martial arts and Iaido (Japanese samurai sword). During that whole time though, I had kept in contact with my Japanese friend Tetsu and his mother whom I consider my family. Then suddenly one day, I picked up a Japanese grammar book again and the fire reignited. Today, I know so much more and have so much more of a grasp of the grammar than I had when I started learning Japanese again. We have a slang phrase in American English. It is "You got this, girl!" It means "Don't give up! You will be a success at this!!!!" So go out there and make it happen. Listen to music in the language you are studying, if anything, to keep your skills afloat. :)

May 5, 2014

I know people are going to thumb me down to minus six again for my comment, but I will say it anyway. Why do you think this is not true:

 

It seems like that my brain has no space for new vocabularies (I know this is not true. ).

 

I actually think it can be true. All people have a capacity to remember things, and it is limited. I am not judging your capacity, I do not know that. But it can certainly be possible that you are overworked and have set unrealistic goals for yourself. In your profile it says you are learing four langauges, apart from that you also have a job and a study at the university which probably does not include the languages you are studying. I can go with the crowd again and shout: You can do it! Come on!! But from what I know, my advice would be to limit your activities somehow, and concentrate on a few things. Better do a few things good than many things half.

 

If you do, you are not the only one. I recently have given up a language myself. I have a new job which it too demanding at the moment, and I have to focus on that for now. The job includes a lot of technology and German, but not another language I studied for a year. But if I am realistic, I have to choose, I have to set priorities and focus on what is really important. So that other challange is 'in the fridge' at the moment.

April 20, 2014
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Doris Day Δωρίς
Language Skills
Cebuano, Chinese (Mandarin), English, Filipino (Tagalog), Spanish
Learning Language
Chinese (Mandarin), Spanish