waleed
How to speak English fluently ?
May 7, 2011 6:22 PM
Answers · 7
I am also a English language learner like you. I am going through some free online English video lessons http://youtu.be/cOKde_7ZLUM to learn to speak English language fluently.
February 19, 2013
I think I have exceeded the word limit. Anyway here is the final paragraph: I think it is unfair to suggest that native speakers speak ungrammatically as this is merely assuming a prescriptive approach to grammar. It is a fallacy that spoken English is not grammatical. If I were to say "went we park to the" then of course that is ungrammatical syntactically. So indeed there is an element of correct grammar if for nothing else other than intelligibility but it is by no means the main concern. As for what Mr. Tumpliner alluded to in terms of the Indian English speaker being better than native English speakers then this is another issue altogether. Which is better and why is really a case of one’s perception. Is one dialect superior to another? or is a dialect considered to be socially inferior? This dynamic whilst being present on the global stage is also of course equally present even within countries themselves. In the UK you have of course 'the queen's English' also referred to as 'BBC English' and then you have regional variations like 'cockney English' spoken in the east end of London. Which is better and which you should emulate I leave for you or your society at large to decide. Regards, Muhammed Abbas Khan * Taken from: "The Study of Language, George Yule, (Page 163), Cambridge University Press, 2006"
May 20, 2011
Dear Waleed, When you say 'fluently' what does that mean to you or indeed to the society that you live in. Native-speaker-like-fluency is accorded status in the Arab world. So whether you choose to emulate the American, UK or other models is really up to you. The question arises how best to acquire (not learn) fluency. We are concerned with language acquisition as opposed to language learning. In fact George Yule states: "The term acquisition is used to refer to the gradual development of ability in a language by using it naturally in communicative situations with others who know the language. The term learning, however, applies to a more conscious process of accumulating knowledge of the features, such as vocabulary and grammar, of a language, typically in an institutional setting. (Mathematics, for example, is learned, not acquired.) Activities associated with learning have traditionally been used in language teaching in schools and have a tendency, when successful, to result in more knowledge ‘about’ the language (as demonstrated in tests) than fluency in actually using the language (as demonstrated in social interaction). Activities associated with acquisition are those experienced by the young child and, by analogy, those who ‘pick up’ a second language from long periods spent in interaction, constantly using the language, with native speakers of the language. Those individuals whose L2 exposure is primarily a learning type of experience tend not to develop the same kind of general proficiency ('fluency'-added by me) as those who have had more of an acquisition type of experience."* So in short you need to be more involved in communicative activities with native speakers or indeed if you choose to Indian English language speakers. I think it is unfair to suggest that native speakers speak ungrammatically as this is merely assuming a prescriptive approach to grammar. It is a fallacy that spoken English is not grammatical. If I were to say "went we par
May 20, 2011
Dear Waleed, When you say 'fluently' what does that mean to you or indeed to the society that you live in. Native-speaker-like-fluency is accorded status in the Arab world. So whether you choose to emulate the American, UK or other models is really up to you. The question arises how best to acquire (not learn) fluency. We are concerned with language acquisition as opposed to language learning. In fact George Yule states: "The term acquisition is used to refer to the gradual development of ability in a language by using it naturally in communicative situations with others who know the language. The term learning, however, applies to a more conscious process of accumulating knowledge of the features, such as vocabulary and grammar, of a language, typically in an institutional setting. (Mathematics, for example, is learned, not acquired.) Activities associated with learning have traditionally been used in language teaching in schools and have a tendency, when successful, to result in more knowledge ‘about’ the language (as demonstrated in tests) than fluency in actually using the language (as demonstrated in social interaction). Activities associated with acquisition are those experienced by the young child and, by analogy, those who ‘pick up’ a second language from long periods spent in interaction, constantly using the language, with native speakers of the language. Those individuals whose L2 exposure is primarily a learning type of experience tend not to develop the same kind of general proficiency ('fluency'-added by me) as those who have had more of an acquisition type of experience."* So in short you need to be more involved in communicative activities with native speakers or indeed if you choose to Indian English language speakers. I think it is unfair to suggest that native speakers speak ungrammatically as this is merely assuming a prescriptive approach to grammar. It is a fallacy that spoken English is not grammatical. If I were to say "went we par
May 20, 2011
I would say not to even try to speak it fluently. Just try to get to a point where you can make yourself understood in different areas that you want to communicate about. Then try to listen to people or radio or conversations in these areas that you want to talk about. Believe me, it is rare to find even a native speaker who knows most words in many subject areas, let alone all subject areas. So just try to get to a good level of communication in areas that you want to use English. English speakers are used to hearing it spoken by different peoples. There are many different accents, even within an English-speaking country. Don't worry about an accent. Just try to concentrate on good grammar. I like hearing educated Indians speak English because even though they have a very different accent, usually they have very good grammar-- better than many native speakers who have gotten lazy about it. So new speakers who pay a lot of attention to grammar actually help to stabilize the language.
May 7, 2011
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waleed
Language Skills
Arabic, English
Learning Language
English