Guni
I'm confused about words that are used with numbers and a standard. Could you make sentences for me please? I'm confused about words that are used with numbers and a standard. Such as 'below, lower, less than,...' and ' more than, above, over, exceeding' ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ***Assuming the scores of math test are below in a class Average = 60, A's score = 80, B's = 60, C's = 50 How can I describe when 1) ( a number > average) A's socore is ....., A is ..... or in any forms. A's scores is above the average??? 2) (* a number >= average) A's scores is the same and above the average??? 3) (*a number < average) 4) (*a number <= average) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thank you for your time and answers.
May 16, 2011 10:27 AM
Answers · 4
There is no single word that will express >= or <=. A conjuncture is required (generally, or). In mathematical terms there are set expressions: A > B = A is greater than B. A >= B = A is greater than or equal to B. A < B = A is less than B. A <= B = A is less than or equal to B. However, there is a more general and less 'mathy' way to describe this: S > 90 -> His score is above 90. S >= 90 -> His score is 90 or above. His score is at or above 90. S < 90 -> His score is below 90. S <= 90 -> His score is 90 or below. His score is at or below 90. S > A -> His score is above (the) average. S >= A -> His score is at or above (the) average. S < A -> His score is below (the) average. S <= A -> His score is at or below (the) average. The other terms you present can be used as well, but some may require you to become more wordy to make them natural. S < A -> His score is lower than (the) average. S < A -> His score is less than (the) average. S > A -> His score is more than (the) average. (This is a bit awkward) S > A -> His score is over (the) average. S > A -> His score exceeds (the) average. Using 'the': This is a bit of a tricky case. You'll notice in Elliot's examples he used 'the' before average in one example and didn't use it in the second. This is because average is used as both a noun and an adjective in very similar ways. When average is a noun, it should be a physical number or amount in which things can be reliably judged against. In this case you need 'the.' If it is used as an adjective it's a description and thus average is more an idea of what the average should be. It might be exact and specific, or it could be very general. Note: In mathematical terms, you should almost always be using 'average' as a noun, and thus would always include 'the'.
May 16, 2011
His score is the average. His score is higher than the average. His score is above average. His score is lower than the average. His score is below average. There is no word for <=.
May 16, 2011
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Guni
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English, Korean
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English