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April
"were" or "are" in this sentence "Most experiments that WERE carried out on animals do not now require a live animal for realistic results." I know "that were carried out on animals" is used to describe "most experiments", and this sentence could also be changed into "Most experiments carried out on animals do not...." But why this sentence uses "WERE" not "ARE" here? does it mean what the author is saying about are past experiments, not experiments carried out now? or does it because the action "carry out" need to happen at least a second before the action "require"? Thanks a lot!!!
Jan 28, 2012 3:01 PM
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Answers · 13
If there are no more such experiments or your were talking about experiments in the past, you would use "were". If the experiments are still being carried on and you are including those experiments, then the present tense ('are') should be used. The author seems to be talking about specific experiments which happened in the past.
January 28, 2012
Were indicates the past. Are indicates the present. In this sentence they are referring to a past action, that is experiments that were carried out, and then they refer to a present action, that is experiments (implied) that do not now require a live animal.....
January 28, 2012
It's absolutely clear from this sentence that the author is talking about the experiments which are not carried out any more. Is it really possible to carry out any experiment on animals without using animals? :)))
January 28, 2012
You're right, April, but if the author was reffering to animal cells or their blood it would be wrong to use the word "animals" talking about that sort of experiments.
January 28, 2012
Yes, the author is saying about the past experiments. In the past, those experiments required live animals, but now, such experiments do not require live animals. The meaning becomes clearer if we say it using "which": "Most experiments, which were carried out on animals, now do not require a live animal for realistic results."
January 28, 2012
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April
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, Japanese
Learning Language
Japanese