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Jade
why the common phrase "a dream come true" seems grammatically wrong? I know and understand "a kissing girl" means a girl that is kising, or "a well-known man" means a man that has been widely known... Though I've been told that the phrase "a dream come true" means like:"a dream WHICH HAS come true", doesn't it seem grammatically wrong? If not, then likewise "a girl grown up" would be a correct phrase...which means a girl who has grown up... Please help me, thanks!!
Feb 4, 2012 5:43 PM
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Answers · 12
I really don't understand what you're driving at with your question. Yes, you can understand "a dream come true" as "a dream which has come true". You can also take "a girl who has grown up" and use "a girl grown up". "A girl kissing" is also correct. So my basic answer is: there is no problem here. I think you're still stuck in intermediate grammar, so read more and you'll see how it works.
February 4, 2012
a dream (that has) come true We often leave out "that has" in such clauses. There is nothing incorrect here. "A girl that has grown up" is not the same as "a grown up girl". She's a girl all grown up now...is not an unusual phrase. It is correct, too.
February 4, 2012
Hi! I think it's better to use "a dream become true", because the word COME, in this case, is a short form of BECOME. That's why it sounds wrong! Do you agree with me?
February 4, 2012
Very interesting. I wonder if it's just one of those times when you look at something for so long that it doesn't make any sense. A dream come true a kissing girl They both have words missing, "A dream which has come true" - "a girl who is kissing" - I'm not very good at the mechanics of English, yet, but I see from the 2 examples above that we can compare the parts true girl dream kissing true and girl are not the same things - a dream and kissing are not the same things - This is not a good answer but sometimes English is better to just accept than question, I wonder if we could imagine a dream, sitting on top of a pedestal - people could look and say, it's a dream which has not come true - or they could look and say, "it's a dream come true". Personally, I would say both saying, I would say, "it's a dream come true" as a thing / event - and I would say, "It's a dream which has come true" - if I was trying to inform someone of my desire for the dream/ desire to become a reality, and to inform them that indeed the dream did become a reality. Perhaps it means the same but it's just a shorter way to say it, like we say "I'm on the bus" instead of "I'm sitting on a seat which is in the bus" - we like to make things shorter and easier. I'd very much like to hear a professional's opinion on your question. Good question, thank you.
February 4, 2012
Literally it is correct: a girl grown up. It's just about some idiomatic use, people're more used to well-known man, grown-up man, but sometimes under particular contexts, you could say a man well known, a girl grown up, it seems that way the emphasis would be on "well-known"/"grown up", like a priest doing some eulogy or something.
February 4, 2012
Jade
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Cantonese), English, Russian
Learning Language
Russian