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Yancey
through backdoor 'through backdoor' doesn't mean enter some places through the back door in China ,it has another implication. such as:If I want to buy a movie ticket,but there are a lot of people queueing up,and the manager of the theatre is my friend,so I get a ticket from him without waithing in the line. We Chinese call it 'through backdoor' I have looked up the dictionary,I know an English phrase is the same in meaning ,that phrase is 'pull some strings'. By any chance,do the native English speaker use the phrase 'through backdoor' instead of 'pulling some strings'? It is an interesting question ,Is there anyone who can answer this question ?Thank you in advance
Feb 11, 2012 8:21 AM
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Answers · 9
Yes I have heard this phrase many times and it means the same here as it does there
February 11, 2012
It was not long ago, a few decades, when this had a more prominent meaning that is not as recognized today. It would be used when someone has another person over for a visit or to do work in the home, but they do not want to be seen as having "that kind of guest." So sadly, this could be thought of as a resist concept. But the therm has morphed into being used for when you want to go in a place that YOU do not want to be seen in. "I will use the back door" (and no one will know I was there.) And now, it can also mean a similar thing as in China also.
February 11, 2012
Although ''through the back door" has more than one meaning in the US, just as in China it is used to indicate '''bending the rules" or ''circumventing established procedure." However, although the meaning in the US may be the same as that in China, the usage may not always be the same.
February 11, 2012
Inetresting. "Connections" huh?
February 11, 2012
至于这一点,他们和我们想法完全一致,没什么差别!
February 11, 2012
Yancey
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English