Bruce
i want to know "it was not more than might be won in the course of the evening" grammatically,thanks The following sentences are from Pride and Prejudice, and ,my question is ,how to understand the last sentence grammatically "it was not more than might be won in the course of the evening" Should it be "it was not more than (that ) (it)might be won in the course of the evening"??or it might be won not more than in the course of the evening?????? TILL Elizabeth entered the drawing-room at Netherfield and looked in vain for Mr. Wickham among the cluster of red coats there assembled, a doubt of his being present had never occurred to her. The certainty of meeting him had not been checked by any of those recollections that might not unreasonably have alarmed her. She had dressed with more than usual care, and prepared in the highest spirits for the conquest of all that remained unsubdued of his heart, trusting that it was not more than might be won in the course of the evening.
Sep 16, 2012 3:01 PM
Answers · 4
The sentence is correct, but uses a form that has been replaced in current English. It would be more likely to be state today as: "trusting that it was not more than that which might be won in the course of the evening." OR "trusting that it was not more than that which you might win in the course of the evening. "
September 16, 2012
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