Amy
Are these sentences natural? (verb, noun phrase ellipsis in sentence containing auxiliary) a. John will select me, and Bill will you b. John gave Bill a lot of money, and Bill will Susan. c. John will select me more happily than Bill will you d. John gave Bill a lot more money than Bill will Susan.
Sep 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Answers · 5
Sentence C sounds natural to me. This is a sentence that is spoken and the speaker is speaking directly to the person "you". The others seem to lack an action after the last will or are too long. Rewriting them to make them read more natural a. John will select me and Bill you. ( you would hear this sentence if the person being referred to as "you" were present. The speaker would be speaking directly to the person "you". This would not be a written sentence.) b. John gave Bill a lot of money, and Bill will to Susan. d. John gave Bill a lot more money than Bill will to Susan.
September 23, 2012
a. John will select me, and Bill will you --Wrong use of "will". Perhaps: John will choose me, AS Bill will you. b. John gave Bill a lot of money, and Bill will Susan. --Verb tenses don't match AND wrong use of "will". c. John will select me more happily than Bill will you --Wrong use of "will". John will be a lot happier with me that Bill with you. d. John gave Bill a lot more money than Bill will Susan. John gave Bill a lot more money than Bill will ever give Susan. This is the correct way to use "will" and to make this sentence.
September 24, 2012
(Sigh...) Pseudogapping is more tricky than subdeletion.
September 24, 2012
I know the sentences are correct because a~d sentences are extracts from paper, On pseudogapping by John Bowers July 17 1998. But, it wasn't certain that practical usage of sentences in everyday conversation. It's not necessary to apply to all independent clauses that verb tenses should be consistent in an independent clause as what matters is consistency of tenses in individual one clause.
September 24, 2012
I believe those sentences are grammatically correct, however, they are seldomly used. It looks like a style of writing or speaking that was used 100 years ago, and only by the highly educated and intellectuals, primarily in Britain. Modern English would expect the inclusion (the repetition) of the main verb in each of the second clauses.
September 24, 2012
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