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YANG Lei
"You can start on the 1st of July, ok?" Why use "on" instead of "from" in this sentence?
Oct 10, 2012 3:48 PM
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Answers · 3
To "start" is a single action. We can only start a job on one day, and so "on" is appropriate. If we're talking about a sale on clothes, the store could advertise prices "starting from $10" - because there will be more than one price - for example, $10 for T-shirt, $15 for a shirt, and so on.
October 10, 2012
It’s simply a matter of emphasis. They both have the same meaning but one emphasizes a moment in time (on that day) and the other emphasizes the beginning of a process (from that day forward). From is acceptable because the primary meaning of ""from" is "beginning at a specified time or place."
October 10, 2012
"You can start on the 1st of July", means you can start on that very day. "You can start from the 1st of July", means you can start on a day after the 1st of July.
October 10, 2012
YANG Lei
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French
Learning Language
English, French