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Kuno
I'm a little confused about this sentence. Hello. I was reading an article which was going to be handled in my reading class, but I got stopped by this sentence. And for your better understanding, this article is about a conflict between staying only Islamic and going along with economy development and Islam in Malaysia. Here is the sentence with a bit of context: In last month's elections, Terengganu's became the second state government to be wrested from Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad's federal-ruling coalition by the Islamic party, Pas. And it's people like Johan who make more-secular Malaysians nervous, not to mention foreigners invested in Dr. Mahathir's vision of a country with a progressive economy and a Muslim majority. (In this article, Johan insists on Malaysia staying only Islamic.) Here's my question : How am I supposed to understand the word "invested?" Should I take it for a past participle or just a past verb? And in the "not to mention~" part, does the author mention two things : the foreigners and a Muslim majority? Thanks for your help !
Oct 12, 2012 11:58 PM
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Answers · 5
Kuno, In your example the verb “to invest” means “to devote morally or psychologically, as to a purpose; commit. -Men of our generation are invested in what they do, women in what we are. -They were deeply invested in their children’s lives. -foreigners invested in Dr. Mahathir's vision of a country with a progressive economy and a Muslim majority. = foreigners committed to Dr. Mahathir’s vision of a country with a progressive economy and a Muslim majority. With this meaning the verb is mosty used as a past participle adjective. It would be rare to see it used as a transitive verb: The foreigners invested themselves in Dr. Mahithi’s vision. Toran is correct about “not to mention”. The phrase is used to add emphasis to the main idea with the meaning of “in addition to” or “also”. We were cold, wet, and tired, not to mention extremely hungry. The restaurant makes its own bread and salad dressing, not to mention a great spaghetti sauce.
October 13, 2012
"invested in" is implying that they have a financial interest in his cause. So, to sum up that sentence: "Foreigners who will benefit from Mathathir's vision make more-secular Malaysians nervous." The "not to mention" phrase is used to say that the first thing the author mentions is enough to make his point, but he mentions another thing to support it even more. To rephrase in a way that is easier to understand: "Johan makes more-secular Malaysians nervous, so do foreigners invested in Mathathir's vision."
October 13, 2012
I was reading an article which was going to be handled in IN my reading class, but I got stopped by this sentence. And for your better understanding, this article is about a conflict between staying TRADITIONALLY Islamic OR going along with economy development and Islam in Malaysia. If you invest in an project, then you are invested in that project. This means you are relying on a certain system being in place, most likely to make economic gains. And it's people like Johan who make more-secular Malaysians nervous, not to mention foreigners (who are) invested in Dr. Mahathir's vision of a country with a progressive economy and a Muslim majority. Firstly, the more-secular Muslims are getting nervous. But more importantly (not to mention), so are foreigners who have invested in the country. I must add that Toran has misinterpreted the whole passage.
October 13, 2012
Kuno
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English