Community Web Version Now Available
nozturk
Which one is grammatically ok? When you ask a favor from someone, you must be as polite as you can. When you ask a favor from someone, you should be as polite as you can. When you ask a favor from someone, you've got to be as polite as you can. When you ask a favor from someone, you have to be as polite as you can. When you ask a favor from someone, you need to be as polite as you can.
Oct 17, 2012 10:55 PM
2
0
Answers · 2
Hello again! I agree with the fellow whose name I can't say or type...the five variations of the second clause of your sentence (must, should, got to, have to, need to) are perfect and lovely. :) However, in American English, it is much more common to "ask a favor OF" someone, rather than ask a favor "FROM" someone. I don't quickly find a grammar reference that says "ask a favor FROM" is actually wrong, but "ask a favor OF" gets my vote as the phrase of choice in dominant usage. If the word "from" is used, it it would usually be if the person is "asking FOR a favor FROM" someone. "I need to ask a favor of you." "I need to ask for a favor from you." But maybe this is American usage? Or maybe the parts of the USA I've lived in? Maybe the Brits would differ?
October 18, 2012
They're all fine. Why do you ask?
October 17, 2012
nozturk
Language Skills
English, Turkish
Learning Language
English