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ColdSteel
What the differece between British, American and Australian versions of English language?
Oct 25, 2012 10:16 AM
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OK difference between AmE and BrE... For all the examples I will say AmE first and then BrE. Sometimes it is just the spelling (color / colour), (realize / realise), which you can learn the -or/-our and -ize/-ise difference Sometimes it is a different word, but similar. It is pronounced and spelt differently. For example (mom / mum), (airplane / aeroplane). In BrE for some verbs, instead or adding -ed, we add -t (like AmE, now we also sometimes add -ed): (spelled / spelt), (burned / burnt). Some words are completely different: (candy / sweets), (cookie / biscuit), (sidewalk / pavement), (sneakers / trainers) There are some differences in grammar. For example, in AmE you can say "I got a dog", but in BrE this means (I bought a dog), so we say "I have got a dog" Words can be used differently, like AmE usually use "What's up?" to mean "How are you?", but we can use it to mean "What is the matter?". There are some words like this: in AmE (practice = noun or verb), in BrE (practice = noun, practise = verb) And you also have the same word pronounced differently, like with 'leisure', 'data', etc. Like with 'water': AmE: wot-er, BrE: waw-ter. If you use BrE in US, maybe they will be confused. For example, AmE say: eraser, BrE say: rubber. But in US 'rubber' = condom. So we will ask for a rubber at school, but in the US, they won't. lol And I think Australia and Canada, etc. use a combination of those.
October 26, 2012
I always get asked about British English and American English, so always tell them this: OK difference between AmE and Bre... For all the examples I will say AmE first and then BrE. Sometimes it is just the spelling (color / colour), (realize / realise), which you can learn the -or/-our and -ize/-ise difference Sometimes it is a different word, but similar. It is pronounced and spelt differently. For example (mom / mum), (airplane / aeroplane). In BrE for some verbs, instead or adding -ed, we add -t (like AmE, but now we also sometimes add -ed): (spelt / spelled), (burnt / burned). Some words are completely different: (candy / sweets), (cookie / biscuit), (sidewalk / pavement), (sneakers / trainers) There are some differences in grammar. For example, in AmE you can say "I got a dog", but in BrE this means (I bought a dog), so we say "I have got a dog" Words can be used differently, like AmE usually use "What's up?" to mean "How are you?", but we can use it to mean "What is the matter?". There are some words like this: in AmE (practice = noun or verb), in BrE (practice = noun, practise = verb) And you also have the same word pronounced differently, like with 'leisure', 'data', etc. Like with 'water': AmE: wot-er, BrE: waw-ter. If you use BrE in US, maybe they will be confused. For example, AmE say: eraser, BrE say: rubber. But in US 'rubber' = condom. So we will ask for a rubber at school, but in the US, they won't. lol And I think Australian and Canada, etc. use a combination of those.
October 25, 2012
ColdSteel
Language Skills
Russian
Learning Language
Russian