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Amy
give out, run out, give way 1.After a month their food supplies gave out. 2.Her patience finally gave out. 3.One of the plane's engines gave out in mid-Atlantic. I guess that 'gave out' in the above sentences is the informal expression of 'ran out', and that 'gave out' and 'gave way' in the following sentences are interchangeable. 1.Her legs gave out and she collapsed. 2.The bridge gave way under the weight of the lorry. Am I correctly understanding them?I numbered the two sentences wrong. It should be *4.Her legs gave out and she collapsed. *5.The bridge gave way under the weight of the lorry.
Nov 3, 2012 6:01 PM
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Answers · 3
Give out = ran out of energy or ran out of reserves or supply The food gave out = there was no more food. Her legs gave out = ran out of strength (reserves). Run out = the supply of something is gone. The food ran out. However, you would NOT say her legs ran out. If you had to say 'ran out' with legs, you would have to say "Her legs ran out of strength" Any place where you could say "ran out of " you could use ran out. They ran out of food Their food ran out. Give way = collapse. A bridge, floor, furniture or some sort of natural barrier or support can give way.
November 3, 2012
아미야, 어디에서 그 문장들을 봤어/들었어?? 나는 조금 부자연스러운 것 같아.. ㅋㅋ 글쎄..나는 뭐가 많이 듣는 것: 1. After a month their food supplies ran out 2. Her patience finally ran out 3. One of the plane's engines gave way in mid-Atlantic. 4. Her legs gave way and she collapsed. 5. The bridge gave way under the weight of the lorry. In my experience, I've only ever really heard "gave out/give out" when literally giving people something e.g. flyers or catalogues etc. Or, in terms of a kind of idiomatic expression - "she gave out a bad vibe" (her aura seemed to be bad). Run out = (as answered by fdmaxey) the supply of something is gone e.g. the stock has run out/out of stock (재고 없음) Give way = to become weak/collapse/break usually due to the weight of carrying something or when not being able to withstand a force.
November 4, 2012
Amy
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English