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RICARDO
DO and MAKE, what is the difference? i dont know how to use them.
May 22, 2013 9:33 PM
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Answers · 5
'make' is often used for things you can create. Such as: make a cake make a birthday card If you are 'making' something, then you are 'doing' something. But if you are 'doing' something, you might not be 'making' something: making a cake or birthday card is something you can do 'make' is also used for performing tasks. Such as: make a phone call make an effort 'do' is often used for jobs or activities. Such as: do your homework do your job
May 22, 2013
Do can refer to a hobby, activity, etc. Make usually refers to creating something. Some examples: I do many things in my spare time. I make model cars. I make bread in the oven. Those are things I like to do.
May 22, 2013
gracias rebeca
May 23, 2013
This is a very common question and honestly not very easy to answer. Here is a resource that might be helpful: http://www.inglesmundial.com/Ingles_Avanzado_Leccion7/Ingles_Avanzado_Leccion7_Gramatica.html
May 23, 2013
This is what Matt said above me but Make can also be used not in a physical sense. (Something you can touch in real life), Like, i'm making arrangements or he's making me mad. By make you are creating a cause from an action like, pouring mentos in coke will make it go booooshhh up! By pouring the mentos you create a cause and effect, like making, make is the effect and anything can be the cause. He punched me - Cause So I made him cry, - Effect Made is just a preposition or a small action word that means to "do" something and create an effect or something out of it. I made a cake, I got a cake. "I did that" however has no defined effect. It just means you did something. But make actually brings a product or an EFFECT, I made that", means you made something and got it as a REWARD or PRIZE for "doing" it. Do just means to perform an action.
May 22, 2013
RICARDO
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