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Olga the Obscure
"By showing that you really want to learn, your teacher won't get angry" -? I've come across this sentence in a textbook and I'm wondering if it's correct: "By showing that you really want to learn, your teacher won't get angry". I somehow feel that the subject in each clause of the sentence should be the same person (you) and not 2 different people (you and a teacher). Something like "By showing that you really want to learn you will avoid making your teacher angry". Could someone tell me if the sentence if correct, and if so, can you give me some more examples of similar structures and maybe provide a theoretical explanation of the syntax? Thank you in advance!
May 27, 2013 12:15 PM
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Answers · 7
I agree with you. It would be much clearer if both clauses had the same subject. With this phrasing it sounds as if the teacher is showing that you really want to learn.
May 27, 2013
The first clause is a condition for the second. It's the same as "If you show you really want to learn, your teacher won't get angry." I wrote something about this a while ago: http://www.italki.com/question/194386 "By + [adj. verb phrase], [statement]. = The [statement] occurred, because the [adj. verb phrase] did. Ex: By running frequently, you can get fit quickly. By carefully and intelligently managing our assets, we improved our finances by over 60%. By doing something, something far more dramatic happened. By trying to think of examples using the word 'by', I completely exhausted my imagination."
May 27, 2013
By used as preposition,+v-ing. Ex:By doing that, it will encourage reading. I think the subject is none business with another subject.
May 27, 2013
Olga the Obscure
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English