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Wu Ting
What does “a noble chalk promontory” refer to in the context? At each end of the village, which runs from south-east to north- west, arises a small rivulet: that at the north-west end frequently fails; but the other is a fine perennial spring, little influenced by drought or wet seasons, called Well-head.* This breaks out of some high grounds joining to Nore Hill, a noble chalk promontory, remarkable for sending forth two streams into two different seas. The one to the south becomes a branch of the Arun, running to Arundel, and so falling into the British Channel: the other to the north. What does “a noble chalk promontory” refer to in the second sentence: This breaks out of some high grounds joining to Nore Hill, a noble chalk promontory, remarkable for sending forth two streams into two different seas? PS: this extract is taken from The Natural History of Selborne. Thanks!Does it refer to "some high grounds " or "Nore Hill"?
Jun 9, 2013 11:15 AM
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Answers · 3
It refers to Nore Hill. "Noble" suggests that the land rises majestically above the surrounding land.
June 9, 2013
I‘m not very sure whether it's correct, but I sense it perhaps means "the promontory that consisted of chalk"...according to the southen England geography which I read about...
June 9, 2013
Wu Ting
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French
Learning Language
English