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Heba
why they use " long man " not "tall man " although we should use tall for the vertical legth?
Jun 11, 2013 10:21 PM
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Answers · 9
Where did you see the phrase "long man?" It might be helpful to know the context. Like everyone here, I agree that "tall man" is the normal, everyday way to describe a man who has "great vertical stature." :) However, in East Sussex, England, there is a figure "drawn" into the hill (by natural forces?) that looks like giant man. This figure is known as the "Long Man" in England. Secondly, the American author Steve Englehart wrote a novel called "The Long Man," and in this case, it is not because of the protagonist's height. It is because of his longevity (the man is a super hero who does not age), so the author called his character the "long man."
June 12, 2013
Hi Heba. The adjective 'tall' is always used to describe something vertical, such as a tall building, tower or a person's height. The adjective 'long' is usually used to describe something that is not vertical or not always vertical. For example; it is a long way to Australia or the running track is 100 metres long.
June 11, 2013
I have not seen "long man" used very often. I know in the United States, we use "tall man" almost always.
June 11, 2013
I think the name of the dictionary is Longman (in one word with no space in between). I always assume that it is a some one's last name. Check out the link if you are interested. http://www.houseofnames.com/longman-family-crest
June 12, 2013
Of course, if the man is lying down dead, then "long" is acceptable, because it is a horizontal measurement, not a vertical one. But if a man walked into a room, in standard English we would say, Gosh, that man is so tall. Or ask him, How tall are you? (although in the USA this is not a question we would ask a stranger; although in some cultures this is normal).
June 11, 2013
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Heba
Language Skills
Arabic, English
Learning Language
English