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in the case of Vs in case of Would you explain about the difference?
Jun 16, 2013 3:30 AM
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Answers · 4
Agree with Heinz. (and also with the guy with the Chinese name who is actually British :) ). "In case of" means "in the event of," "if there is," and is used to refer to a potential event that is not expected to occur frequently. Ex: "Please use the stairs in case of a fire" = "Please use the stairs if there is a fire." "In the case of" is a way to bring up a matter as a topic for discussion. Ex: "In the case of James, they decided to promote him to the next grade" = "With regard to James, they decided to promote him to the next grade"
June 16, 2013
in case of (fire) = if there's a (fire) "In the case of" is totally unrelated to "in case of". You don't even need to learn it.
June 16, 2013
Don't use the elevator in case of a fire. In the case of my parent's divorce, my mother was awarded both cars by the court.
June 16, 2013
Could you rephrase your question?
June 16, 2013
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