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Wu Ting
How would you explain this sentence in the context? The cathedral is immense as promised, with gigantic wooden doors that look as if they could shut you out for good. The front is all warbly with carvings: the Ship of the Church sailing over one door looked like a Spanish galleon, and over the other, Jesus is handing over the keys to the kingdom. He has the same worried look the bakery-shop man had when giving Mother the key to come through his shop to our apartment upstairs. Mr. Produce the Cash owns the building. How would you explain this sentence: the Ship of the Church sailing over one door looked like a Spanish galleon, and over the other, Jesus is handing over the keys to the kingdom? How would you explain ‘the Ship of the Church’? By the way, does ‘the kingdom’ mean the inside of the church? Thanks!
Jan 31, 2014 8:29 AM
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Answers · 2
The ship of the church means the main body of the church (building) I think "kingdom" refers to the kindom of God. WIKIPEDIA: In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral basilica and church architecture, the nave is the main body of the church. It provides the central approach to the high altar. The term nave, from medieval Latin navis (ship), was probably suggested by the keel shape of its vaulting.[1] The nave of a church, whether Romanesque, Gothic or Classical, extends from the entry — which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex) — to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles[2] separated from the nave by an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave, the structure is sometimes said to have three naves. In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral basilica and church architecture, the nave is the main body of the church. It provides the central approach to the high altar. The term nave, from medieval Latin navis (ship), was probably suggested by the keel shape of its vaulting.[1] The nave of a church, whether Romanesque, Gothic or Classical, extends from the entry — which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex) — to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles[2] separated from the nave by an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave, the structure is sometimes said to have three naves. the term nave may have arisen (apart from the shape of the church resembling a ship, as mentioned above) because the ship represented the church: the ship of St. Peter. The nave, the main body of the building, was that part of the church set apart for the laity, whereas the chancel was reserved for the clergy. '
January 31, 2014
Ships are sometimes used in Church decoration as a symbol of the church, travelling from this world to the next world. The 'keys to the kingdom' is a reference to the Bible where Jesus says "I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven"
January 31, 2014
Wu Ting
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French
Learning Language
English