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John
Are the following wording right? 1. a multitude of hundreds years 2. a multitude of hundreds ... 3. a few of hundreds 4. a few of hundred 5 a couple of hundreds 6. a couple of hundred
9 февр. 2014 г., 23:36
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Answers · 5
1. a multitude of hundreds years No 2. a multitude of hundreds ... No "Multitude" just means a great number, so I don't think we usually follow it with a number. You can have a "multitude of stars," a "multitude of choices," etc. Or just "the multitude," which means a big group of people, or the common people. 3. a few of hundreds No 4. a few of hundred No You can only say "a few hundred," as in "a few hundred people attended the politician's rally." Or, "a few hundred dogs were at the dog show." 5 a couple of hundreds 6. a couple of hundred I will get back to you on these two. I am not sure right now about the "of" in the middle.
10 февраля 2014 г.
1. a multitude of hundreds years 2. a multitude of hundreds ... 3. a few of hundreds 4. a few of hundred 5 a couple of hundreds 6. a couple of hundred my answers: example: the empire grew after: 1. a multitude of hundreds of years 2. multitudes of hundreds of years 3. a few hundreds of years 4. a few hundred years 5 a couple of hundreds of years 6. a couple hundred years
10 февраля 2014 г.
For 1 and 2, these imply many hundreds of years, so, there are a few correct ways to say it: a multitude of hundreds of years hundreds and hundreds of years many hundreds of years For 3-6, it implies hundreds of years too, but not as many as sentences 1 and 2. A few hundred years... A couple of hundred years... A "few" indicates a small number larger than 2, and a "couple" indicates 2, so when there is a statement of a few hundred or a couple of hundred, the exact number of years isn't known. Only an estimated amount close to either a few hundred or a couple of hundred is known.
10 февраля 2014 г.
John
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English