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xiaokaoy
is ... but not "The purpose of the scheme is not to help the employers but to provide work for young people." This sentence is from my dictionary. Would it also be OK if I say "The purpose of the scheme is to provide work for young people, but not to help the employers."?
Feb 10, 2014 6:34 AM
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Answers · 3
This boils down to: 1) The purpose is not B, but A. 2) The purpose is A, but not B. They have a significant difference in feeling. I mean, you could replace 1) with 2) and it means the same, but the feeling is much different. In 1), there is some expectation that B might be the real purpose, but it's really not. Instead it is A. But in 2), you are simply stating a fact: The purpose is A, but not B. Does that make sense? You could say it this way: 1) The purpose is not B, as you might expect, but instead it is A. 1) The purpose is not B, which might be normal, but instead it is A. Do you see the difference in feeling of 1)?
February 10, 2014
It would be fine to rephrase it like you did. But keep in mind that while the general meaning stays the same, the emphasis of the sentence changes. The original version focuses on "not to help the employers", but your version focuses on "provide work for young people". Hope this helps.
February 10, 2014
xiaokaoy
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English